Merrit Kennedy Merrit Kennedy is a reporter for the NPR News Desk.
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Merrit Kennedy

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Merrit Kennedy 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Merrit Kennedy

Reporter, NPR News Desk

Merrit Kennedy is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers a broad range of issues, from the latest developments out of the Middle East to science research news.

Kennedy joined NPR in Washington, D.C., in December 2015, after seven years living and working in Egypt. She started her journalism career at the beginning of the Egyptian uprising in 2011 and chronicled the ousting of two presidents, eight rounds of elections, and numerous major outbreaks of violence for NPR and other news outlets. She has also worked as a reporter and television producer in Cairo for The Associated Press, covering Egypt, Yemen, Libya, and Sudan.

She grew up in Los Angeles, the Middle East, and places in between, and holds a bachelor's degree in international relations from Stanford University and a master's degree in international human rights law from The American University in Cairo.

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Story Archive

The Tennessee Aquarium says a system connected to an electric eel's tank enables his shocks to power strands of lights on the nearby tree. Thom Benson/AP hide caption

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Thom Benson/AP

Noeel: Electric Eel Lights Up Christmas Tree In Tennessee

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China has responded with swift condemnation after the U.S. Congress overwhelmingly approved a bill targeting its mass crackdown on ethnic Muslim minorities. The bill decries what China describes as educational centers and the U.S. says are detention facilities. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Storm Systems Crashing Across Country Turn Post-Holiday Travel Into A Slog

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A process tower flies through air after exploding at the TPC Group Petrochemical Plant, after an earlier massive explosion sparked a blaze at the plant in Port Neches, Texas, on Wednesday. Erwin Seba/Reuters hide caption

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Erwin Seba/Reuters

French Defense Minister Florence Parly (left) and French Army Chief of Staff Gen. François Lecointre said Tuesday that two helicopters collided in midair and killed 13 French soldiers fighting Islamic extremists in Mali. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

A newly published study from University College London suggests that a single dose of ketamine could help dramatically reduce the alcohol intake of heavy drinkers. Bruce Forster/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Forster/Getty Images

Vapers Fear Stricter Regulation

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Anti-government protesters rally on Friday in Bogotá, the second day of their protests against President Iván Duque, who is trying to get a grip on the unrest by announcing a "national dialogue." Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Blue and White party leader Benny Gantz has failed to form a new government by the deadline, dashing his hopes of toppling longtime Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and pushing Israel closer to an unprecedented third election in less than a year. Oded Balilty/AP hide caption

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Oded Balilty/AP