Merrit Kennedy Merrit Kennedy is a reporter for the NPR News Desk.
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Merrit Kennedy

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Merrit Kennedy 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Merrit Kennedy

Reporter, NPR News Desk

Merrit Kennedy is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers a broad range of issues, from the latest developments out of the Middle East to science research news.

Kennedy joined NPR in Washington, D.C., in December 2015, after seven years living and working in Egypt. She started her journalism career at the beginning of the Egyptian uprising in 2011 and chronicled the ousting of two presidents, eight rounds of elections, and numerous major outbreaks of violence for NPR and other news outlets. She has also worked as a reporter and television producer in Cairo for The Associated Press, covering Egypt, Yemen, Libya, and Sudan.

She grew up in Los Angeles, the Middle East, and places in between, and holds a bachelor's degree in international relations from Stanford University and a master's degree in international human rights law from The American University in Cairo.

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Story Archive

Emergency personnel work the scene of the early morning explosion that Houston Fire Chief Samuel Peña said caused significant damage to nearby homes and even knocked some off their foundations. Collin Eaton/Reuters hide caption

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Collin Eaton/Reuters

The number of pets on planes has become a hot-button issue of late as emotional support animals have become more common than ever. Shelly Yang/Kansas City Star/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Shelly Yang/Kansas City Star/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Federal Government May Tighten Restrictions On Service Animals On Planes

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A traveler walks past a display board showing a canceled flight from Wuhan at Beijing Capital International Airport on Thursday. China closed off the city of more than 11 million in an unprecedented effort to try to contain a deadly new viral illness that has sickened hundreds and spread to other cities and countries during the Lunar New Year travel rush. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Authorities Begin Quarantine Of Wuhan City As Coronavirus Cases Multiply

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The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., sits at the center of what top Democrats and some ethics advisers see as a unique web of conflicts of interest. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Journalist Glenn Greenwald, shown here during a press conference last July, has been accused by Brazilian federal prosecutors in a hacking probe. Ricardo Borges/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Borges/AP

From left: Luke Austin Lane, Jacob Kaderli and Michael Helterbrand are accused of plotting "to overthrow the government and murder a Bartow County couple," according to police in Floyd County, Ga. AP hide caption

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AP

Rep. Ayanna Pressley appears in a video for The Root, the African American-focused online magazine, in which she reveals her bald head and talks about living with alopecia. Courtesy of The Root and G/O Media via AP hide caption

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Courtesy of The Root and G/O Media via AP

A team of Stanford University researchers designed the PigeonBot. Lentink Lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Lentink Lab/Stanford University

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight

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Quitting smoking isn't easy, and while gum or a fidgeting device may not be a silver bullet, cravings can be linked to your daily routine. Thinking of a substitute behavior to use when a craving strikes is one tool that could help you quit. Andee Tagle and Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Andee Tagle and Becky Harlan/NPR

How To Quit Smoking, With Help From Science

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U.S. citizen Moustafa Kassem was arrested amid a massive crackdown on sit-ins in Cairo in Aug. 2013. Police are shown arresting men as they clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. Ahmed Gomaa/AP hide caption

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Ahmed Gomaa/AP

Houston Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow, shown here during the 2019 World Series, has been fired by team owner Jim Crane. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP