Hanna Rosin Along with Alix Spiegel, Hanna Rosin co-hosts Invisibilia, a show from NPR about the unseen forces that control human behavior—our ideas, beliefs, assumptions, and thoughts.
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Hanna Rosin

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Hanna Rosin 2016
John W. Poole/NPR

Hanna Rosin

Co-Host, Invisibilia

Along with Alix Spiegel, Hanna Rosin co-hosts Invisibilia, a show from NPR about the unseen forces that control human behavior—our ideas, beliefs, assumptions, and thoughts. Invisibilia interweaves personal stories with the latest human behavior and brain science, in a way that ultimately makes you see your own life differently. The show was nominated for a Peabody Award in 2015. Rosin's stories have won a Gracie Award and a Jackson Hole Science Media Award. Excerpts of the show are featured on the NPR News programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. The program is available as a podcast.

Rosin came to NPR from the world of print magazines. Most recently she was a national correspondent for The Atlantic, where she wrote cover stories about various corners of American culture. She has also written for The New Yorker and the New York Times magazine. She is a longtime writer for Slate and host of The Waves, a podcast about feminism, politics, and culture. She has been on The Daily Show and The Colbert Report, when they were both shows, and headlined the first TED women's conference. She was part of a team at New York Magazine that won a National Magazine Award for a series of stories on circumcision, and she was nominated for her Atlantic story, Murder by Craigslist. She is also the author of two books, including The End of Men.

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Story Archive

Should We Have Empathy For Those We Hate?

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Invisibilia: The Online Version Of Us Versus Reality

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Invisibilia: When Death Rocks Your World, Maybe You Jump Out Of A Plane

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Allan Aarslev, a police superintendent in Aarhus, became part of the effort to make young Muslims feel like they have a future in Denmark. Scanpix Denmark/USAScanpix/Sipa hide caption

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