Brett Neely Brett Neely is an editor with NPR's Washington Desk.
Allison Shelley/NPR
Brett Neelyin 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brett Neely

Editor, Washington Desk

Brett Neely is an editor with NPR's Washington Desk, where he edits coverage of Congress, elections, campaign finance, government ethics and voting.

Neely came to NPR in 2015 and worked closely with a team of member station reporters throughout the 2016 election cycle as part of NPR's ongoing initiative to deepen its editorial ties with stations. After the 2016 election, he worked with member station colleagues to deepen coverage of state government and politics for local and national audiences.

Before coming to NPR, Neely was a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio News, based in Washington, where he covered Congress and the federal government for one of public radio's largest newsrooms. Between 2007 and 2009, he was based in Berlin where he worked as a freelance reporter for multiple outlets. He got his start in journalism as a producer for the public radio show Marketplace.

Neely graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Occidental College in Los Angeles with a bachelor's degree in international relations. He also received a master's degree in international relations from the University of Chicago. He is a fluent German speaker.

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Story Archive

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh during testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6. Two women have stepped forward to accuse Kavanaugh of inappropriate sexual behavior when he was a teenager. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders told reporters that other presidential administrations also used nondisclosure agreements. Employment lawyers say that's not the whole story. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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National security adviser John Bolton (from left), Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, FBI Director Christopher Wray, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and chief of U.S. Cyber Command Gen. Paul M. Nakasone attend a press briefing on election security at the White House on Thursday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Ballots in New York City ahead of the 2016 general elections. While U.S. election officials have made progress increasing security, gaps still remain. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Week Of Trump Reversals Puts 2018 Election Security In The Spotlight

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EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks at the Faith and Freedom conference in Washington, DC, on June. Pruitt is facing multiple ethics scandals from his actions since taking over the agency. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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As The Scandals Mount, Conservatives Turn On Scott Pruitt

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Adult film actress Stormy Daniels speaks to reporters as she exits a federal courthouse in New York City after a hearing related to Michael Cohen, President Trump's longtime personal attorney and confidante on April 16. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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White House counselor Kellyanne Conway participates in an interview with CNN at the White House in May. Conway was reprimanded for mixing partisan politics with her official duties in TV interviews last fall. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., penned a letter to the White House announcing the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee is opening an investigation into its timeline and handling of a scandal involving a top aide. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

A chartered train carrying dozens of GOP lawmakers to a Republican retreat in West Virginia struck a garbage truck near Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday, lawmakers said. This photo provided by Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., shows the crash site on Wednesday. Rep. Greg Walden via AP hide caption

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Rep. Greg Walden via AP