Susan Davis Susan Davis is a congressional correspondent for NPR.
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Susan Davis

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Susan Davis 2016
Meg Kelly/NPR

Susan Davis

Congressional Correspondent, Washington Desk

Susan Davis is a congressional correspondent for NPR. She has covered Congress, elections, and national politics since 2002 for publications including USA TODAY, The Wall Street Journal, National Journal and Roll Call. She appears regularly on television and radio outlets to discuss congressional and national politics, and she is a contributor on PBS's Washington Week with Robert Costa. She is a graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., and a Philadelphia native.

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Story Archive

Congressional leaders have reached a agreement with the White House on a two-year budget deal. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Trump, Congress Reach Agreement On 2-Year Budget Deal

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Trump Strategy, Attacking 4 Congresswomen Of Color, Could Pay Off

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Kanesha Adams stands in the parking lot outside of Jim Clyburn's World-Famous Fish Fry on June 21 in Columbia, S.C. The event featured appearances by 21 Democratic presidential candidates seeking voters in the early primary state. Sean Rayford for NPR hide caption

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Sean Rayford for NPR

Black Female Voters In South Carolina Mull Presidential Candidates

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Democrats Campaign At South Carolina Fish Fry

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McConnell Faces Internal Pressure On Blockade Of Election Security Legislation

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News Brief: Tanker Attacks, Foreign Election Influence, Sudan Opposition

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Rep. James Clyburn will host a fish fry, a mainstay of South Carolina politics for nearly 30 years, on June 21. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Why 2020 Democrats Are Lining Up For Clyburn's 'World Famous' Fish Fry

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Former Nixon White House Counsel Testifies On Allegations Of Obstruction Against Trump

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Understanding and interpreting a text message isn't always easy. That's where some artificial intelligence companies want to help, by analyzing conversations and providing feedback. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images

Need Help Deciphering That Vague Text Message? AI Wants To Help

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As the battle for the thermostat is being waged in offices and homes across the U.S., a new study shows that women perform better in certain areas when the temperature is higher. Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Study Shows Freezing Office Temperatures Affect Women's Productivity

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