Barbara Sprunt Barbara Sprunt is a producer on NPR's Washington Desk.
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Rep.-elect Lucy McBath, D-Ga., reacts after drawing her number during the Member-elect room lottery draw on Capitol Hill in Washington on Friday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Office Real Estate Is A Game Of Chance For New House Members

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Suburban Female Voters Are A Pivotal Group In A Key Virginia District

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President Trump shakes hands with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy during a rally this summer. If Republicans keep their majority, McCarthy could be the next speaker of the House. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has outlined a legislative agenda that includes Democratic priorities like lowering prescription drug prices and overhauling campaign finance laws. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spoke at a weekly news conference in Washington on Tuesday, the same day as double headlines about Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen — but McConnell declined to comment on their legal troubles. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Judge T.S. Ellis III gives jury instructions in front of tax fraud defendant Paul Manafort on Tuesday. Art Lien hide caption

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Art Lien

Jury Finds Paul Manafort Guilty In Federal Tax And Bank Fraud Trial

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President Trump announces US Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

As Supreme Court Nears Solid Conservative Majority, GOP Reaps Reward From 'Long Game'

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Sen. Orrin Hatch's social media team offered many examples of "proof of life" on Monday night. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Orrin Hatch Would Like You To Know He's Still Alive

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Activists are launching their campaigns now to try to influence the choice of the next Supreme Court justice. Supporters of President Trump are expected to spend millions of dollars. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Facing An Uphill Battle, Activists Race To Oppose Trump's Supreme Court Pick

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President Trump and first lady Melania Trump prepare to greet French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte Macron, as they arrive for a state dinner at the White House on Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Brigitte Macron, first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and President Trump attend a state arrival ceremony at the White House on Tuesday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

First State Dinner: A Chance For Melania Trump To Put Her Stamp On The White House

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Senior White House policy adviser Stephen Miller talks to reporters about President Trump's support for creating a "merit-based immigration system" in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on Aug. 2. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'That's Stephen': White House Adviser's Controversial Style Dates Back To His Youth

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