Barbara Sprunt Barbara Sprunt is a producer on NPR's Washington Desk.
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Barbara Sprunt

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Barbara Sprunt 2017
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Barbara Sprunt

Producer, Washington Desk

Barbara Sprunt is a producer on NPR's Washington desk, where she reports and produces breaking news and feature political content. She formerly produced the NPR Politics Podcast and got her start in radio at as an intern on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered and Tell Me More with Michel Martin. She is an alumnus of the Paul Miller Reporting Fellowship at the National Press Foundation. She is a graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., and a Pennsylvania native.

Story Archive

The Democratic National Committee's executive director thanked the U.S. Capitol Police for containing the threat near the group's headquarters in Washington, D.C., pictured in 2018. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland holds a press conference Thursday to announce a lawsuit against Texas. The Department of Justice is seeking a permanent injunction against the state's new abortion law. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Justice Department Sues Texas Over New Abortion Ban

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President Biden bows his head in a moment of silence Thursday as he speaks about the situation in Afghanistan from the White House's East Room. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is working to keep moderates and progressives on the same page to move two separate bills — an infrastructure bill and a broader spending package. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Afghan special immigrant visa applicants crowd into an internet cafe to apply for that program on Aug. 8 in Kabul. A group of senators expressed concern the U.S. is abandoning allies who helped in the 20-year mission in Afghanistan. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., seen here during a May hearing on Capitol Hill, said in a statement that the withdrawal of U.S. troops "should have been carefully planned to prevent violence and instability." SUSAN WALSH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SUSAN WALSH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Josh Gottheimer, D-N.J., seen here at a December news conference, is one of nine House Democrats threatening to withhold their support for a crucial budget resolution unless Speaker Nancy Pelosi first brings up a vote on the bipartisan infrastructure bill. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Rep. Cori Bush, center, joined staffers and activists in protesting on Saturday the expiration of the eviction moratorium. The Biden administration on Tuesday announced an extension of the ban. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y., seen here during a House Intelligence Committee hearing in 2019, rejects the conventional wisdom that House Democrats will likely lose their majority next November. Yara Nardi/Getty Images hide caption

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Yara Nardi/Getty Images

How House Democrats' Campaign Chief Plans To Defy History In 2022

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A new spending deal includes $300 million to upgrade windows and doors at the U.S. Capitol, and to install new cameras. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

U.S. Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell wipes tears while testifying Tuesday during the opening hearing of the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Jim Bourg/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Bourg/Pool/Getty Images