Barbara Sprunt Barbara Sprunt is a producer on NPR's Washington Desk.
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Barbara Sprunt

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Barbara Sprunt 2017
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Barbara Sprunt

Producer, Washington Desk

Barbara Sprunt is a producer on NPR's Washington desk, where she reports and produces breaking news and feature political content. She formerly produced the NPR Politics Podcast and got her start in radio at as an intern on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered and Tell Me More with Michel Martin. She is an alumnus of the Paul Miller Reporting Fellowship at the National Press Foundation. She is a graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., and a Pennsylvania native.

Story Archive

Voters With Disabilities Worry About Their Ability To Cast Ballots In Wisconsin

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Martha Chambers, seen here at her home in Milwaukee, Wis., has relied on ballot return assistance for decades. The state's high court is weighing whether current Wisconsin law allows for that help. Darren Hauck for NPR hide caption

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Darren Hauck for NPR

Wisconsin voters with disabilities say their right to vote is at risk

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Rep. Greg Stanton, D-Ariz., speaks during a news conference about infrastructure outside the U.S. Capitol on May 12, 2021. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Redistricting and Democrats' stalled agenda put this blue Arizona House seat in play

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After Decades Of Bipartisan Teamwork, Republicans Quit Presidential Debate Commission

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Caucusgoers are seen here in Carpenter, Iowa, on Feb. 3, 2020. The Democratic National Convention approved a resolution Wednesday that revamps its presidential nominating process, which means Iowa could lose its "first in the nation" status. Steve Pope/Getty Images hide caption

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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi receives a COVID-19 vaccination record card from Dr. Brian Monahan, attending physician for the U.S. Congress, after getting a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine on Dec. 18, 2020. Ken Cedeno/AP hide caption

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Ken Cedeno/AP

Lawmakers are discussing how Congress would function in a catastrophe that incapacitates a large number of lawmakers. Currently, there are no clear plans despite a number of close calls. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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What happens if half of Congress dies? Even Congress isn't sure.

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Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., questions Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson during the judge's confirmation hearing on March 22. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson arrives to the office of Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet for meeting Thursday in Washington, D.C. On Wednesday, Jackson concluded her final day of questioning during her confirmation hearings with the Senate Judiciary Committee. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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