Barbara Sprunt Barbara Sprunt is a producer on NPR's Washington Desk.
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Barbara Sprunt

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Barbara Sprunt 2017
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Barbara Sprunt

Producer, Washington Desk

Barbara Sprunt is a producer on NPR's Washington desk, where she reports and produces breaking news and feature political content. She formerly produced the NPR Politics Podcast and got her start in radio at as an intern on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered and Tell Me More with Michel Martin. She is an alumnus of the Paul Miller Reporting Fellowship at the National Press Foundation. She is a graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., and a Pennsylvania native.

Story Archive

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y., seen here during a House Intelligence Committee hearing in 2019, rejects the conventional wisdom that House Democrats will likely lose their majority next November. Yara Nardi/Getty Images hide caption

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Yara Nardi/Getty Images

How House Democrats' Campaign Chief Plans To Defy History In 2022

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A new spending deal includes $300 million to upgrade windows and doors at the U.S. Capitol, and to install new cameras. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

U.S. Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell wipes tears while testifying Tuesday during the opening hearing of the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Jim Bourg/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Bourg/Pool/Getty Images

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., chairs the Jan. 6 select committee. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., is one of the members. Tom Williams; Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call hide caption

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Tom Williams; Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call

Britney Spears, seen here at an awards event in April 2018, has renewed the debate over conservatorships, with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle expressing support for the pop star. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

A Republican And Democrat Have Come Together To #FreeBritney

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This file photo shows the marble bust of Chief Justice Roger Taney that is currently displayed in the Old Supreme Court Chamber in the U.S. Capitol. The House voted Tuesday on a bill that would remove the bust from public display. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke for the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division speaks during a news conference Friday announcing a lawsuit against the state of Georgia for its new voting law. Attorney General Merrick Garland is at right. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

A Miami-Dade Fire Rescue truck is seen Thursday in front of debris from the partially collapsed Champlain Towers South complex in Surfside, Fla., north of Miami Beach. Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

Sens. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., take questions at a news conference last week after a procedural vote for the bipartisan infrastructure framework. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speaks Tuesday after the weekly Senate Republican Policy luncheon. McConnell united his caucus in opposition to Democrats' election overhaul bill. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images