Jane Greenhalgh Jane Greenhalgh is a senior producer and editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Jane Greenhalgh, NPR
Stories By

Jane Greenhalgh

Jane Greenhalgh

Senior Producer and Editor, Science Desk

Jane Greenhalgh is a senior producer and editor on NPR's Science Desk.

She produces the weekly Health segment on NPR's Morning Edition and writes and edits for NPR's health blog, "Shots." Greenhalgh also produces stories on science, health, and global health across NPR's many platforms.

Greenhalgh was part of the team of broadcast, digital, and multimedia journalists who produced the 2015 award-winning series "#15Girls," which examined the struggles teenage girls face throughout the developing world. Greenhalgh's story "Banished to the Shed" was one of NPR's most listened to and viewed stories of 2015.

She has twice won The American Association for the Advancement of Science award: In 2020 for her work on Victoria's Story: Gene editing helps people with sickle cell, and for NPR's 2014 series "The human microbiome: guts and glory." Greenhalgh also won The National Academies of Science Communication award in 2014, and she was part of the digital team which won for the 2009 series Climate Connections. She traveled extensively for this year-long, multi-platform project, examining how climate change is affecting people across the globe. From Timbuktu, where the desert nomads are giving up their way of life, to Peru, where potato farmers are moving their crops higher up the mountain, and to Bangladesh, where scientists are experimenting with drought and flood resistant rice, the stories Greenhalgh produced chronicled the impact of climate change.

Greenhalgh has traveled extensively covering health issues in developing countries, including cholera in Haiti, polio in Indonesia, tuberculosis in Kenya, AIDS in India, malaria in the Gambia, malnutrition in Bolivia, and menstrual health in Nepal.

Story Archive

Scott Olson/Getty Images

The new COVID boosters rolling out this month represent a shift in strategy, said White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish Jha during a press briefing. The goal now will likely be to roll out new boosters annually. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

The new COVID booster could be the last you'll need for a year, federal officials say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1121289835/1121346549" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vials of the reformulated Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster move through production at a plant in Kalamazoo, Mich. Pfizer Inc. hide caption

toggle caption
Pfizer Inc.

CDC recommends new booster shots to fight omicron

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1120560488/1120599981" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Flags at the Washington Monument commemorate Americans who died from COVID-19. In 2021, life expectancy in the U.S. fell for the second year in a row. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The FDA has authorized second booster shots for people over 50 and for some people who are immunocompromised. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Do I really need another booster? The answer depends on age, risk and timing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1089503225/1089631044" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As immunity wanes fom the first booster, the FDA has now authorized a second shot for people 50 and older and some immunocompromised people. The CDC has also recommended that people get the booster. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

CDC recommends 2nd COVID boosters for some older and immunocompromised people

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1089072803/1089121262" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People wait in line for a coronavirus test in Los Angeles on Tuesday. California is starting to feel the full wrath of the omicron variant. Hospitalizations have jumped nearly 50% since Christmas and models show that in a month, the state could have 22,000 people in hospitals, which was the peak during last winter's epic surge. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jae C. Hong/AP

Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine for young children is a lower-dose formulation of the companies' adult vaccine. It was found to be safe and nearly 91% effective at preventing COVID-19. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

A third shot of the Moderna vaccine boosts protection across age groups, notably in older adults, the company says. Juana Miyer/Long Visual Press/Universal Imag hide caption

toggle caption
Juana Miyer/Long Visual Press/Universal Imag

Having a compromised immune system puts you at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19. Studies show that the initial vaccine doses are less effective for people with weakened immune systems. A third shot can boost protection. Christiana Botic/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christiana Botic/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Family members gather outside the window of a COVID-19 patient at Lake Regional Hospital in Osage Beach, Mo., on Monday. Sarah Blake Morgan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Blake Morgan/AP

A CDC Document Gives New Details On Just How Dangerous The Delta Variant Really Is

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1022580439/1022693120" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript