Malaka Gharib Malaka Gharib is the deputy editor and digital strategist on NPR's global health and development team.
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Malaka Gharib

Maro Mercene
Malaka Gharib headshot
Maro Mercene

Malaka Gharib

Deputy Editor and Digital Strategist, Goats and Soda

Malaka Gharib is the deputy editor and digital strategist on NPR's global health and development team. She covers topics such as the refugee crisis, gender equality and women's health. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with two Gracie Awards: in 2019 for How To Raise A Human, a series on global parenting, and in 2015 for #15Girls, a series that profiled teen girls around the world.

Gharib is also a cartoonist. She is the artist and author of I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir, about growing up as a first generation Filipino Egyptian American. Her comics have been featured in NPR, Catapult Magazine, The Believer Magazine, The Nib, The New York Times and The New Yorker.

Before coming to NPR in 2015, Gharib worked at the Malala Fund, a global education charity founded by Malala Yousafzai, and the ONE Campaign, an anti-poverty advocacy group founded by Bono. She graduated from Syracuse University with a dual degree in journalism and marketing.

Story Archive

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22 tips for 2022: Get creative, even if you aren't feeling inspired

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Our correspondent Michaeleen Doucleff's daughter, Rosy, at age 2, as she does dishes voluntarily. Getting her involved in chores did lead to the kitchen being flooded and dishes being broken, Doucleff reports. But Rosy is still eager to help. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

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Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR

How to raise kind kids, a booze ban, BTS at U.N.: Our top non-pandemic global stories

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Seydou Keïta/SKPE—Courtesy CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection Seydou Keïta/SKPE/CAAC/The Pigozzi Collection hide caption

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Seydou Keïta/SKPE/CAAC/The Pigozzi Collection

Left to right: An illustration of the coronavirus, an illustration of the delta variant and a mural in India. Hanna Barczyk for NPR / Juan Gaertner/Science Source / Sanchit Khanna/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR / Juan Gaertner/Science Source / Sanchit Khanna/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Our 11 most-read global pandemic stories of 2021

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USAID Administrator Samantha Power delivered a speech on her "new vision" for the agency on Nov. 4 at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Peter Singer, the Australian philosopher and bioethicist, is the winner of the 2021 Berggruen Prize. The $1 million award is given to an individual who has made major contributions to advancing ideas that shape the world. His idea for the prize money: give it all away. Joe Armao/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Armao/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Joel Charny, who's been a humanitarian aid worker for 40 years, talks to students at a camp for internally displaced people in northern Sri Lanka in 2005. It's one of his favorite photos, he says, "because this is what I did hundreds of times: interview people about what they were going through and what they needed for their lives to improve." Courtesy of Joel Charny hide caption

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Courtesy of Joel Charny

Beninese chef and cookbook author Valerie Vinakpon, center, is coming up with novel ways to present her country's fare, hoping to get people excited about Beninese cooking. Above, she talks to High On The Hog co-hosts Jessica B. Harris, left, and Stephen Satterfield, right, at her restaurant Saveurs du Benin. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix