Malaka Gharib Malaka Gharib is the deputy editor and digital strategist on NPR's global health and development team.
Malaka Gharib headshot
Stories By

Malaka Gharib

Maro Mercene
Malaka Gharib headshot
Maro Mercene

Malaka Gharib

Deputy Editor and Digital Strategist, Goats and Soda

Malaka Gharib is the deputy editor and digital strategist on NPR's global health and development team. She covers topics such as the refugee crisis, gender equality and women's health. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with two Gracie Awards: in 2019 for How To Raise A Human, a series on global parenting, and in 2015 for #15Girls, a series that profiled teen girls around the world.

Gharib is also a cartoonist. She is the artist and author of I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir, about growing up as a first generation Filipino Egyptian American. Her comics have been featured in NPR, Catapult Magazine, The Believer Magazine, The Nib, The New York Times and The New Yorker.

Before coming to NPR in 2015, Gharib worked at the Malala Fund, a global education charity founded by Malala Yousafzai, and the ONE Campaign, an anti-poverty advocacy group founded by Bono. She graduated from Syracuse University with a dual degree in journalism and marketing.

Story Archive

USAID Administrator Samantha Power delivered a speech on her "new vision" for the agency on Nov. 4 at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Peter Singer, the Australian philosopher and bioethicist, is the winner of the 2021 Berggruen Prize. The $1 million award is given to an individual who has made major contributions to advancing ideas that shape the world. His idea for the prize money: give it all away. Joe Armao/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Armao/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Joel Charny, who's been a humanitarian aid worker for 40 years, talks to students at a camp for internally displaced people in northern Sri Lanka in 2005. It's one of his favorite photos, he says, "because this is what I did hundreds of times: interview people about what they were going through and what they needed for their lives to improve." Courtesy of Joel Charny hide caption

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Courtesy of Joel Charny

Beninese chef and cookbook author Valerie Vinakpon, center, is coming up with novel ways to present her country's fare, hoping to get people excited about Beninese cooking. Above, she talks to High On The Hog co-hosts Jessica B. Harris, left, and Stephen Satterfield, right, at her restaurant Saveurs du Benin. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

In his new book for young teenagers, Charles Kenny points out signs of global progress, including the growing number of kids in school. Above: The Oloo Education Center aims to provide an education to kids in Kibera, a poor community in Nairobi, Kenya. When you type "Kibera" into the Uber app, it comes up as "Kibera slum." Julia Gunther for NPR hide caption

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Julia Gunther for NPR

Two teen activists spoke at last week's Generation Equality Forum in Paris: Yande Banda, left, a 17-year-old from Lusaka, Zambia, and Selin Ozunaldim, 18, from Istanbul. The girls were not happy about the time allotted for their remarks at the forum. Yande Banda; Bulent Ozunaldim hide caption

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Yande Banda; Bulent Ozunaldim

Ghana is the first country to receive a shipment of COVID-19 vaccines from the global COVAX program. Above: The vaccines are unloaded at the Kotoka International Airport in Accra on February 24. Nipah Dennis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nipah Dennis/AFP via Getty Images

Workers from the garment sector block a road during a protest to demand payment of due wages, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in April 2020. They claimed that factories had not paid them after retailers and brands cancelled orders due to worldwide lockdown measures. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images