Malaka Gharib Malaka Gharib is the deputy editor and digital strategist on NPR's global health and development team.
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Malaka Gharib

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Malaka Gharib 2016
Rebecca Harlan/NPR

Malaka Gharib

Deputy Editor and Digital Strategist, Goats and Soda

Malaka Gharib is the deputy editor and digital strategist on NPR's global health and development team. She covers topics such as the refugee crisis, gender equality and women's health. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with two Gracie Awards: in 2019 for How To Raise A Human, a series on global parenting, and in 2015 for #15Girls, a series that profiled teen girls around the world.

Gharib is also a cartoonist. She is the artist and author of I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir, about growing up as a first generation Filipino Egyptian American. Her comics have been featured in NPR, Catapult Magazine, The Believer Magazine, The Nib, The New York Times and The New Yorker.

Before coming to NPR in 2015, Gharib worked at the Malala Fund, a global education charity founded by Malala Yousafzai, and the ONE Campaign, an anti-poverty advocacy group founded by Bono. She graduated from Syracuse University with a dual degree in journalism and marketing.

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Ghana is the first country to receive a shipment of COVID-19 vaccines from the global COVAX program. Above: The vaccines are unloaded at the Kotoka International Airport in Accra on February 24. Nipah Dennis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nipah Dennis/AFP via Getty Images

Workers from the garment sector block a road during a protest to demand payment of due wages, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in April 2020. They claimed that factories had not paid them after retailers and brands cancelled orders due to worldwide lockdown measures. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images

Eric Dossekpli, 49, is a farmer and father of six in the town of Anfoin Avele,Togo. He says he can no longer sell his crops as a result of the pandemic. Floriane Acouetey hide caption

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Floriane Acouetey

The Pandemic Pushed This Farmer Into Deep Poverty. Then Something Amazing Happened

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Open up any social media app on your phone and you'll see it: links to COVID-19 information from trustworthy sources. Here, a Twitter screen reads, "No, 5G isn't causing coronavirus." Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

A barefoot porter totes a load for an expedition visiting one of the remaining glaciers near the equator, 16,000 feet high on the highest peak in Papua, Indonesia. George Steinmetz hide caption

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George Steinmetz
Malaka Gharib/ NPR

COMIC: A Kids' Guide To Coping With The Pandemic (And A Printable Zine)

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Health workers protest against economic hardship and poor working conditions during the COVID-19 outbreak in Harare, Zimbabwe. Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters hide caption

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Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters

Dao Thi Hoa, right, chairwoman of the Intergenerational Self Help Club in the Khuong Din ward of Hanoi in Vietnam, checks the club's account book with other members. Nguyễn Văn Hốt hide caption

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Nguyễn Văn Hốt