Gabrielle Emanuel
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Gabrielle Emanuel

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Wednesday

Bernard Chiira founded the Assistive Technologies for Disability Trust or AT4D. It is an accelerator that has supported 45 startups from 11 countries. Many of the startups aim to help people with disabilities access the technologies they need – including wheelchairs. Gabrielle Emanuel/NPR hide caption

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Gabrielle Emanuel/NPR

Tuesday

An EMT wearing personal protective equipment prepares to unload COVID-19 transfer patients in the early days of the pandemic. The Biden Administration has just announced a new program aimed at preventing the next pandemic. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Wednesday

Democratic Republic of Congo is experiencing its largest outbreak of mpox

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Reading glasses are easy to come by in Western countries. But getting a pair in the Global South can be a challenge. A new study shows the surprising benefits that a pair of specs can bring. Maica/Getty Images hide caption

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Maica/Getty Images

Glasses aren't just good for your eyes. They can be a boon to income, too

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Thursday

Dengue Cases Hit Record Levels in North and South America

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Wednesday

The palms of a patient with mpox during an outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1997. The country is now seeing a dramatic spike in mpox — with a strain that is deadlier than the one that sparked the global outbreak in 2022. CDC/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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CDC/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Major mpox outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a worry to disease docs

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Wednesday

Isabela Oside, 45, washes hands of her daughter Faith, 3, who completed doses through the worlds first malaria vaccine. Malaria is one of the preventable diseases that contributes to worldwide child mortality. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

Why a new report on child mortality is historic, encouraging — and grim

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U.N. report: Fewer and fewer children under age 5 are dying worldwide

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Friday

Syrian medics launched a vaccination campaign in the northwestern Idlib province in early 2023. Such campaigns depend on the global cholera vaccine stockpile, which is currently empty. Omar Haj Kadour/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Haj Kadour/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

The world is facing a major cholera vaccine shortage amid outbreaks

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Monday

Massachusetts' shelter system is at capacity as family homelessness hits record high

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Saturday

250 years ago, colonists dumped British tea into the Boston harbor

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Saturday

Migrant families arriving in Massachusetts face uncertainty as they're put on waitlists

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Sunday

Wednesday

Monday

Why the number of kids enrolled in a federal benefit program has dropped dramatically

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Tuesday

A group of firefighters say some of their gear contains PFAS and may cause cancer

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Thursday

The story of how the birth control pill was invented and tested

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Wednesday

Bozie and Swarna are elephants at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. Gabrielle Emanuel/Gabrielle Emanuel hide caption

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Gabrielle Emanuel/Gabrielle Emanuel

Why zoos can't buy or sell animals

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Tuesday

New EPA regulations target PFAs in drinking water

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Wednesday

With nowhere else to go, some Massachusetts families are sleeping in the ER

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Thursday

A broken wheelchair can bring life to a standstill and create multiple problems

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Saturday

Before migrants were sent to Martha's Vineyard, there were the "Reverse Freedom Rides"

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Thursday

Radiation was another treatment that researchers were refining at the time. Gordon Isaacs was the first patient treated with the linear accelerator (radiation therapy) for retinoblastoma. Gordon's right eye was removed January 11, 1957 because the cancer had spread. His left eye had only a localized tumor and was treated with the electron beam. Gordon's vision in the left eye returned to normal. NIH/National Cancer Institute hide caption

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NIH/National Cancer Institute