Noel King Noel King is host of Morning Edition and Up First.
Noel King
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Noel King

Sandy Honig/NPR
Noel King

Noel King

Sandy Honig/NPR

Noel King

Host, Morning Edition and Up First

Noel King is a host of Morning Edition and Up First.

Previously, as a correspondent at Planet Money, Noel's reporting centered on economic questions that don't have simple answers. Her stories have explored what is owed to victims of police brutality who were coerced into false confessions, how institutions that benefited from slavery are atoning to the descendants of enslaved Americans, and why a giant Chinese conglomerate invested millions of dollars in her small, rural hometown. Her favorite part of the job is finding complex, and often conflicted, people at the center of these stories.

Noel has also served as a fill-in host for Weekend All Things Considered and 1A from NPR Member station WAMU.

Before coming to NPR, she was a senior reporter and fill-in host for Marketplace. At Marketplace, she investigated the causes and consequences of inequality. She spent five months embedded in a pop-up news bureau examining gentrification in an L.A. neighborhood, listened in as low-income and wealthy residents of a single street in New Orleans negotiated the best way to live side-by-side, and wandered through Baltimore in search of the legacy of a $100 million federal job-creation effort.

Noel got her start in radio when she moved to Sudan a few months after graduating from college, at the height of the Darfur conflict. From 2004 to 2007, she was a freelancer for Voice of America based in Khartoum. Her reporting took her to the far reaches of the divided country. From 2007 - 2008, she was based in Kigali, covering Rwanda's economic and social transformation, and entrenched conflicts in the the Democratic Republic of Congo. From 2011 to 2013, she was based in Cairo, reporting on Egypt's uprising and its aftermath for PRI's The World, the CBC, and the BBC.

Noel was part of the team that launched The Takeaway, a live news show from WNYC and PRI. During her tenure as managing producer, the show's coverage of race in America won an RTDNA UNITY Award. She also served as a fill-in host of the program.

She graduated from Brown University with a degree in American Civilization, and is a proud native of Kerhonkson, NY.

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Story Archive

People celebrate at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis after the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin murder trial on Tuesday. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Activist: Convictions In George Floyd's Death Could Represent 'A Huge Paradigm Shift'

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News Brief: Chauvin Found Guilty Of All 3 Counts In Floyd's Death

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Demonstrators attend a peace walk on Sunday honoring the life of 13-year-old Adam Toledo in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood. Shafkat Anowar/AP hide caption

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Attorney For Adam Toledo's Family: 'Adam Died Because He Complied'

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Georgetown Law School professor Paul Butler testifies before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on policing practices and law enforcement accountability in June 2020. In an NPR interview, Butler says police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., didn't need to pursue Daunte Wright over an outstanding warrant. Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Law Professor: Police Hold 'Extraordinary' Power Over Black People In Traffic Stops

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News Brief: Manslaughter Charges, I-G Report, U.S. Mulls Sanctions On Russia

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News Brief: Minneapolis Turmoil, J&J Shot, U.S.' Afghan Exit Plan

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News Brief: Shooting Probe, Iran Nuclear Site, Russia-Ukraine Tensions

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News Brief: Chauvin Trial, COVID-19 Vaccine Demand, Supply Crunch

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Some of the country's highways were built through existing Black and brown communities. President Biden's infrastructure plan aims to address racial inequities. Richard Baker/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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A Brief History Of How Racism Shaped Interstate Highways

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News Brief: Chauvin Trial, Reviving Nuclear Talks, U.K. Slowly Reopens

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News Brief: U.S. COVID Status, Ga. Voting Law, Plot Foiled In Jordan

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies during a Senate hearing last month on the federal coronavirus response. Susan Walsh/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Fauci Expects Surge In Vaccinations To Keep A 4th Coronavirus Wave At Bay

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U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg speaks to Amtrak employees Feb. 5 during a visit at Union Station in Washington, D.C. In a Thursday interview with NPR's Morning Edition, he said not making infrastructure investment would be a "threat to American competitiveness." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Buttigieg Says $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan Is A 'Common Sense Investment'

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News Brief: Infrastructure Funds, Vaccine Batch Ruined, Detention Costs

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Biden Administration To Unveil Expansive $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

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