Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
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Alison Kodjak 2016
Noel St. John/NPR

Alison Kodjak

Health Policy Correspondent, Science Desk

Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.

Her work focuses on the business and politics of health care and how those forces flow through to the general public. Her stories about drug prices, limits on insurance and changes in Medicare and Medicaid appear on NPR's shows and in the Shots blog.

She joined NPR in September 2015 after a nearly two-decade career in print journalism, where she won several awards—including three George Polk Awards—as an economics, finance, and investigative reporter.

She spent two years at the Center for Public Integrity, leading projects in financial, telecom, and political reporting. Her first project at the Center, "After the Meltdown," was honored with the 2014 Polk Award for business reporting and the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award.

Her work as both reporter and editor on the foreclosure crisis in Florida, on Warren Buffet's predatory mobile home businesses, and on the telecom industry were honored by several journalism organizations. She was part of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists team that won the 2015 Polk Award for revealing offshore banking practices.

Prior to joining the Center, Alison spent more than a decade at Bloomberg News, where she wrote about the convergence of politics, government, and economics. She interviewed chairmen of the Federal Reserve and traveled the world with two U.S. Treasury secretaries.

And as part of Bloomberg's investigative team she wrote about the bankruptcy of General Motors Corp. and the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill. She was part of a team at Bloomberg that successfully sued the Federal Reserve to release records of the 2008 bank bailouts, an effort that was honored with the 2009 George Polk Award. Her work on the international food price crisis in 2008 won her the Overseas Press Club's Malcolm Forbes Award.

Fitzgerald Kodjak and co-author Stanley Reed are authors of In Too Deep: BP and the Drilling Race that Took It Down, published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons.

She's a graduate of Georgetown University and Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

She raises children and chickens in suburban Maryland.

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Story Archive

The Department of Health and Humans Services is adding a Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in some kinds of care because of moral or religious objections. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

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HHS To Protect Health Workers With Religious Objections

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News Brief: HHS To Protect Religious Objectors, Trump's First Year Poll, Apple Jobs

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, led efforts to require work for Medicaid recipients while in charge of Indiana's program. She was sworn in as administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services by Vice President Pence on March 14. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Administration Will Let States Require People To Work For Medicaid

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What Happens To Obamacare If Individual Mandate Disappears?

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Isabel Diaz Tinoco and Jose Luis Tinoco had some questions for the Miami insurance agent who helped guide them in signing up for a HealthCare.gov policy at the Mall of the Americas in November. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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HealthCare.gov Enrollment Ends Friday. Sign-Ups Likely To Trail Last Year's

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Parents Worry Congress Won't Fund The Children's Health Insurance Program

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CVS Health has struck a deal to buy Aetna, the insurance giant. The combined companies would have more clout with drugmakers and would aim to bring more health care to consumers in retail clinics. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

News Brief: The Latest On The GOP Tax Bill; CVS Buys Aetna

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Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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House Tax Plan Would Eliminate Medical Expense Deduction

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More than 30,000 people a year are killed by gun violence, including 50 killed near the Los Vegas strip last month where this makeshift memorial stands. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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What If We Treated Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis?

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