Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
Alison Kodjak, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Alison Kodjak

Mike Morgan/NPR
Alison Kodjak, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Alison Kodjak

Health Policy Correspondent, Science Desk

Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.

Her work focuses on the business and politics of health care and how those forces flow through to the general public. Her stories about drug prices, limits on insurance, and changes in Medicare and Medicaid appear on NPR's shows and in the Shots blog.

She joined NPR in September 2015 after a nearly two-decade career in print journalism, where she won several awards—including three George Polk Awards—as an economics, finance, and investigative reporter.

She spent two years at the Center for Public Integrity, leading projects in financial, telecom, and political reporting. Her first project at the Center, "After the Meltdown," was honored with the 2014 Polk Award for business reporting and the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award.

Her work as both reporter and editor on the foreclosure crisis in Florida, on Warren Buffet's predatory mobile home businesses, and on the telecom industry were honored by several journalism organizations. She was part of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists team that won the 2015 Polk Award for revealing offshore banking practices.

Prior to joining the Center, Fitzgerald Kodjak spent more than a decade at Bloomberg News, where she wrote about the convergence of politics, government, and economics. She interviewed chairs of the Federal Reserve and traveled the world with two U.S. Treasury secretaries.

And as part of Bloomberg's investigative team, she wrote about the bankruptcy of General Motors Corp. and the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill. She was part of a team at Bloomberg that successfully sued the Federal Reserve to release records of the 2008 bank bailouts, an effort that was honored with the 2009 George Polk Award. Her work on the international food price crisis in 2008 won her the Overseas Press Club's Malcolm Forbes Award.

Fitzgerald Kodjak and co-author Stanley Reed are authors of In Too Deep: BP and the Drilling Race that Took It Down, published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons.

In January 2019, Fitzgerald Kodjak began her one-year term as the President of the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

She's a graduate of Georgetown University and Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

She raises children and chickens in suburban Maryland.

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The Trump administration aims to boost competition among hospitals and cut costs by letting consumers see how widely prices can vary for the same medical or surgical procedure. But health economists say patients typically have little choice in choosing their hospital. teekid/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Hospitals And Insurers Might Be Forced To Reveal The True Prices They Negotiate

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FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb Says He'll Leave The Agency Next Month

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Commissioner Of Food And Drug Administration Announces He Will Resign

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Drug prices in the United States support spending on research and development, said AbbVie CEO Richard Gonzalez (far left) in testimony by drug company executives before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Leaders Of 7 Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Face Tough Questioning On Capitol Hill

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Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., left, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, asked drug company CEOs some tough questions about drug prices on Tuesday during a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

CVS plans to transform some of its stores into "health hubs," retail locations revamped to include more health care services and products. One of the first is in Spring, Texas, a suburb of Houston. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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CVS Looks To Make Its Drugstores A Destination For Health Care

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Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar delivers remarks to reporters while participating in a roundtable about health care prices at the White House on Jan. 23. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., at an Oakland, Calif., campaign rally this week. Harris says she backs a single-payer health system, but she hasn't yet offered details on how she would finance that plan. Mason Trinca/Getty Images hide caption

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We Answer The Question: What Is Medicare For All?

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a speech Thursday to the new Congress that Democrats want "to lower health care costs and prescription drug prices and protect people with pre-existing medical conditions." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Democrats' Health Care Ambitions Meet The Reality Of Divided Government

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While some new drugs entering the market are driving up prices for consumers, drug companies are also hiking prices on older drugs. Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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