Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
Alison Kodjak, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Alison Kodjak

CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald Resigns After Reports Show Investment In Tobacco Stocks

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Health Stocks Drop After Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway And JPMorgan Chase Announcement

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The Department of Health and Humans Services is adding a Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in some kinds of care because of moral or religious objections. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

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HHS To Protect Health Workers With Religious Objections

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News Brief: HHS To Protect Religious Objectors, Trump's First Year Poll, Apple Jobs

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, led efforts to require work for Medicaid recipients while in charge of Indiana's program. She was sworn in as administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services by Vice President Pence on March 14. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Will Let States Require People To Work For Medicaid

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What Happens To Obamacare If Individual Mandate Disappears?

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Isabel Diaz Tinoco and Jose Luis Tinoco had some questions for the Miami insurance agent who helped guide them in signing up for a HealthCare.gov policy at the Mall of the Americas in November. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

HealthCare.gov Enrollment Ends Friday. Sign-Ups Likely To Trail Last Year's

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Parents Worry Congress Won't Fund The Children's Health Insurance Program

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CVS Health has struck a deal to buy Aetna, the insurance giant. The combined companies would have more clout with drugmakers and would aim to bring more health care to consumers in retail clinics. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

News Brief: The Latest On The GOP Tax Bill; CVS Buys Aetna

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Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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