Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
Alison Kodjak, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Alison Kodjak

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Many Dislike Health Care System But Are Pleased With Their Own Care

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a Las Vegas high school last Friday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton Hitches Her Health Care Wagon To Obamacare

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, a 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, has proposed a health care policy he calls "Medicare for All." But some left-leaning economists say the plan doesn't pencil out. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sanders' Health Plan Renews Debate On Universal Coverage

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Nancy Retzlaff, chief commercial officer for Turing Pharmaceuticals, was asked how much the drug Daraprim costs at the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Capitol Hill on Thursday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

House Hearing Probes The Mystery Of High Drug Prices That 'Nobody Pays'

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Martin Shkreli was CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals when the company boosted the price of a drug by 5,000 percent. He has since resigned. Paul Taggart/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Taggart/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The price of getting a health insurance card may seem expensive, but officials say the minimum tax penalty for remaining uninsured is $695, and could rise to more than $10,000 for wealthy families who choose not to get coverage. Photo Alto/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Alto/Getty Images

Tim Kilroy runs a business from his home in Arlington, Mass. His insurance company quit covering the long-acting Ritalin that helps him manage his ADHD. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Ellen Webber for NPR

Fight To Lower Drug Prices Forces Some To Switch Medication

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FDA Approval Could Turn A Free Drug For A Rare Disease Pricey

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Obamacare Deadline Extended As Demand For Health Insurance Rises

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Martha Lucia (from left), Bienvendida Barreno and Jorge Baquero discuss health insurance options with agents from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors at a Miami mall last month. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Obamacare Sign-Ups Could Get A Bump As Higher Penalties Kick In

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Despite Emphasis On Big Hacks, Small Breaches Of Medical Privacy Do More Harm

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