Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
Alison Kodjak, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Alison Kodjak

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That Surgery Might Cost You A Lot Less In Another Town

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Life Expectancy Drops For White Women, Increases For Black Men

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UnitedHealth Group, based in Minnetonka, Minn., says it expects to lose $650 million on health exchange plans this year. Many people who bought the plans are in relatively poor health, the company says. Mike Bradley/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Bradley/Bloomberg via Getty Images

If UnitedHealth Group. based in Minnetonka, Minn., pulls back from the Obamacare exchanges, premiums nationwide would go up around 1 percent, a Kaiser Family Foundation reports finds. Mike Bradley/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Bradley/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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A Fitbit Saved His Life? Well, Maybe

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Cancer And Arthritis Drugs Drive Up Spending On Medicines

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Erbitux is used to treat cancers that start in the head and neck and tumors there that spread from other parts of the body. Because its effectiveness varies, should the price also? Dr. P. Marazzi/Science Source hide caption

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Dr. P. Marazzi/Science Source

Barbara Radley, of Oshkosh, Wis., has diabetes, liver failure and scleroderma. Even filing for bankruptcy early last year didn't stop her financial woes, she says. The medical bills keep piling up. Jason Houge for NPR hide caption

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Jason Houge for NPR

Medical Bills Still Take A Big Toll, Even With Insurance

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Donald Trump Releases Details Of Health Care Plan

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Many Dislike Health Care System But Are Pleased With Their Own Care

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