Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
Alison Kodjak, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Alison Kodjak

There will be about 55 percent more people with diabetes as baby boomers become senior citizens, a report finds. Rolf Bruderer/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rolf Bruderer/Blend Images/Getty Images

A mosquito control inspector sprinkles larvicide in a storm drain in Miami Gardens, Fla., in an effort to stop the spread of Zika virus. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Health Departments Cut Programs While Awaiting Zika Funding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478729074/478729075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
iStockphoto

Fact-Checking Hillary Clinton's Medicare Buy-In Proposal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477836054/477836055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Imodium is a popular brand of the drug loperamide. Because loperamide is increasingly being abused by opioid users, some toxicologists think it should have the same sales restrictions as pseudoephedrine. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Renee Powell's family must pay more than $13,000 per year in out-of-pocket health care costs before they are fully covered. Courtesy of Renee Powell hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Renee Powell

Politics In Real Life: Rising Health Care Costs Weigh On Voters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476517927/476559555" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Alyson Hurt/NPR

That Surgery Might Cost You A Lot Less In Another Town

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475880565/475923683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Daniel Fung/iStockphoto

Life Expectancy Drops For White Women, Increases For Black Men

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474884894/474935527" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

UnitedHealth Group, based in Minnetonka, Minn., says it expects to lose $650 million on health exchange plans this year. Many people who bought the plans are in relatively poor health, the company says. Mike Bradley/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Bradley/Bloomberg via Getty Images

If UnitedHealth Group. based in Minnetonka, Minn., pulls back from the Obamacare exchanges, premiums nationwide would go up around 1 percent, a Kaiser Family Foundation reports finds. Mike Bradley/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Bradley/Bloomberg via Getty Images
iStockphoto

A Fitbit Saved His Life? Well, Maybe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473393761/473772725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript