Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
Alison Kodjak, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Alison Kodjak

Mylan, the maker of EpiPen, says it will sell a generic version for $300 for a two-pack, a price that consumer advocates say is still too high. The device is used to treat severe allergic reactions. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Maker Of EpiPen To Sell Generic Version For Half The Price

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Mother Calls EpiPen Price Hike 'A Matter Of Life And Death'

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The cost of an EpiPen two-pack has risen more than 400 percent in recent years. The drug is used to halt severe allergic reactions. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Discounts Aren't Enough to Halt Outrage At High EpiPen Prices

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An aggressive marketing campaign has made the EpiPen the go-to drug for treating anaphylaxis. Mark Zaleski/AP hide caption

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Mark Zaleski/AP

EpiPen Manufacturer Says It Will Help With Out-Of-Pocket Costs

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Aetna is the latest big health insurer to retreat from the exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Aetna Joins Other Major Insurers In Pulling Back From Obamacare

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Express Scripts assures patients it has a policy of not putting cancer medicine or mental health drugs on the list of products it excludes from its formulary. Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

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Fuse/Getty Images

Will Your Prescription Meds Be Covered Next Year? Better Check!

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In 2015, the Sandoz unit of drugmaker Novartis won Food and Drug Administration approval of a drug called Zarxio, which is similar to Amgen's Neupogen, a medicine that boosts the production of white blood cells. Sebastien Bozon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastien Bozon/AFP/Getty Images

A demonstration dose of Suboxone film, which is placed under the tongue. It is used to treat opioid addiction. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Maryland Switches Opioid Treatments, And Some Patients Cry Foul

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Senate Expected To Pass Broad Bill To Address Opioid Epidemic

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A guide works on the federal enrollment website as she helps a Delaware resident sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act in 2014. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Raymond Biesinger for NPR

Hassle Of Being A Patient Can Turn Into A Crisis Without Sick Leave

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As many as 70,000 more people could get access to office-based treatment for opioid use now that the administration has raised the cap on the number of patients each doctor is allowed to treat. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Her income as a New Orleans singer fluctuates with the tourist season, says Lisa Lynn Kotnik, and that's made health insurance too expensive in the past. Now that she has a Medicaid card, getting the health care and medicine she needs should be easier. Courtesy of Skip Bolen hide caption

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Courtesy of Skip Bolen

Louisiana Medicaid Expansion Brings Insurance To Many New Orleans Musicians

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