Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
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Alison Kodjak 2016
Noel St. John/NPR

Alison Kodjak

Health Policy Correspondent, Science Desk

Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.

Her work focuses on the business and politics of health care and how those forces flow through to the general public. Her stories about drug prices, limits on insurance and changes in Medicare and Medicaid appear on NPR's shows and in the Shots blog.

She joined NPR in September 2015 after a nearly two-decade career in print journalism, where she won several awards—including three George Polk Awards—as an economics, finance, and investigative reporter.

She spent two years at the Center for Public Integrity, leading projects in financial, telecom, and political reporting. Her first project at the Center, "After the Meltdown," was honored with the 2014 Polk Award for business reporting and the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award.

Her work as both reporter and editor on the foreclosure crisis in Florida, on Warren Buffet's predatory mobile home businesses, and on the telecom industry were honored by several journalism organizations. She was part of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists team that won the 2015 Polk Award for revealing offshore banking practices.

Prior to joining the Center, Alison spent more than a decade at Bloomberg News, where she wrote about the convergence of politics, government, and economics. She interviewed chairmen of the Federal Reserve and traveled the world with two U.S. Treasury secretaries.

And as part of Bloomberg's investigative team she wrote about the bankruptcy of General Motors Corp. and the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill. She was part of a team at Bloomberg that successfully sued the Federal Reserve to release records of the 2008 bank bailouts, an effort that was honored with the 2009 George Polk Award. Her work on the international food price crisis in 2008 won her the Overseas Press Club's Malcolm Forbes Award.

Fitzgerald Kodjak and co-author Stanley Reed are authors of In Too Deep: BP and the Drilling Race that Took It Down, published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons.

She's a graduate of Georgetown University and Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

She raises children and chickens in suburban Maryland.

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Louisiana's New Approach To Treating Hepatitis C

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How Drug Companies Control How Their Drugs Are Covered By Medicaid

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Investigation: Patients' Drug Options Under Medicaid Heavily Influenced By Drugmakers

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Supreme Court Nominee May Be Hard To Pin Down On Obamacare

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Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh Could Leave His Mark On Many Health Care Cases

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Why Health Insurance Premiums May Rise Next Year

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A 4-year-old Honduran girl carries a doll while walking with her immigrant mother. Both were released Sunday from federal detention in McAllen, Texas. Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Separating Kids From Their Parents Can Lead To Long-Term Health Problems

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Margarita Mills (left), an insurance agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, speaks with Daniela Morales as she shops for insurance under the Affordable Care Act at a store set up in the Mall of Americas, on Nov. 1, 2017, in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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The Food and Drug Administration approves more than 99 percent of applications for compassionate use of experimental medicines. But supporters of a right-to-try law want a more direct approach. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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HHS Secretary Clarifies Trump Administration's Plan To Reduce Prescription Drug Prices

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar talked Friday about the administration's plans to lower drug prices as President Trump looked on in the White House Rose Garden. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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