Phil Harrell Phil Harrell is a senior producer with All Things Considered.

Phil Harrell

Senior Producer, All Things Considered

Phil Harrell is a senior producer with All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine. He has been at NPR since 1999.

At NPR, Harrell has worked on a variety of shows and produced a little bit of everything—from politics to pop music. Most memorably, he worked through the nights after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster and after the death of President Ronald Reagan, producing mini-documentaries about each story for Weekend Edition.

Harrell got his start in radio as a rock 'n' roll DJ/program director at progressive WRNR in Annapolis, MD. He later co-created the Bob Edwards Show for XM and Bob Edwards Weekend for PRI.

Harrell has won numerous awards for his excellence in production. In 2006 and 2011, he led the teams that claimed the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Radio Broadcast Award. In addition, he won the Gabriel Award in both 2012 and 2014 with hosts Guy Raz and Arun Rath.

A native of Maryland, Harrell is a graduate of the University of Maryland-College Park.

Highlights from Phil Harrell:

Lowlights from Phil Harrell:

  • He almost killed Clint Eastwood by losing his balance and collapsing into him
  • He almost capsized a kayak paddled by NPR's Brian Naylor
  • He almost lost a recording that represented an entire day's worth of reporting in South Dakota
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Story Archive

Singer Katy Perry performs (with her sharks) during the Super Bowl XLIX halftime on Feb. 1, 2015. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Man Behind 'Left Shark' Explains His Viral Super Bowl Moment

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Lorde, seen here at the 2014 Grammy Awards, is the only woman nominated in this year's album of the year category. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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New Study Shows A Grave Lack Of Gender Diversity In The Music Industry

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Isaac Hayes, seen here in a photo from the 1970s, is one of the funk pioneers honored in the Funk Music Hall of Fame. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Funk Carves Out A Groove At The Funk Music Hall Of Fame In Ohio

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Otis Redding performs on the British TV show Ready Steady Go in 1966. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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'Dock Of The Bay' At 50: Why Otis Redding's Biggest Hit Almost Went Unheard

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Ron Miles' I Am a Man is one of the best albums of 2017. Thomas J. Krebs/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Thomas J. Krebs/Courtesy of the artist

Morning Edition Looks Back On Some Of The Best Albums Of 2017

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Mel Tormé in Piccadilly, London, 1956. John Franks/Getty Images hide caption

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The Story Behind 'The Christmas Song'

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Randy Newman stopped by NPR for a performance and interview with Steve Inskeep. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Soundtracks, Satire And A Sense Of Place: A Conversation With Randy Newman

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Baltimore jazz pianist Lafayette Gilchrist's new album features a song dedicated to Freddie Gray. David I Muir/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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David I Muir/Courtesy of the artist

Lafayette Gilchrist Plays The 'Blues For Freddie Gray'

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Keith Emerson of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, an essential prog-rock band derided in the 1970s by critic Lester Bangs. Chris Walter/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Can't Prog Rock Get Any Respect Around Here?

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Twins Allison (left) and Katie Crutchfield started out playing music together as teens. Since then, their work has taken them in different directions; each has a new solo album out this year. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Through My Sister's Eyes: Allison And Katie Crutchfield On Each Other's Music

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