Phil Harrell Phil Harrell is a producer with Morning Edition.
Stories By

Phil Harrell

Phil Harrell

Producer, Morning Edition

Phil Harrell is a producer with Morning Edition, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine. He has been at NPR since 1999.

At NPR, Harrell has worked on a variety of shows and produced a little bit of everything—from politics to pop music. Most memorably, he worked through the nights after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster and after the death of President Ronald Reagan, producing mini-documentaries about each story for Weekend Edition.

Harrell got his start in radio as a rock 'n' roll DJ/program director at progressive WRNR in Annapolis, MD. He later co-created the Bob Edwards Show for XM and Bob Edwards Weekend for PRI.

Harrell has won numerous awards for his excellence in production. In 2006 and 2011, he led the teams that claimed the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Radio Broadcast Award. In addition, he won the Gabriel Award in both 2012 and 2014 with hosts Guy Raz and Arun Rath.

A native of Maryland, Harrell is a graduate of the University of Maryland-College Park.

Highlights from Phil Harrell:

Lowlights from Phil Harrell:

  • He almost killed Clint Eastwood by losing his balance and collapsing into him
  • He almost capsized a kayak paddled by NPR's Brian Naylor
  • He almost lost a recording that represented an entire day's worth of reporting in South Dakota

Story Archive

Palestinian American comedian Mohammed Amer stars in Mo, a new Netflix series out Wednesday. Netflix © 2022 hide caption

toggle caption
Netflix © 2022

Mohammed Amer's new series explores the tragedy and comedy in the refugee experience

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1118770031/1118959455" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demi Lovato. Brandon Bowen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Bowen/Courtesy of the artist

Demi Lovato on taking the power back through a heavy new album, 'HOLY F***'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1118279665/1118365696" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bartees Strange. Luke Piotrowski/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Luke Piotrowski/Courtesy of the artist

Bartees Strange explores his journey from 'Farm to Table'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1105478740/1106193469" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

St. Louis Cardinals players Curt Flood, Bill White and Bob Gibson, pictured in 1966, 1962 and 1967, respectively. They are the focus of a new History Channel documentary about the Black baseball players who followed Jackie Robinson into the major league. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Black baseball players struggled long after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1105272766/1105790916" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Lillie Eiger/Courtesy of the artist

Where is 'Harry's House' anyway? Harry Styles explains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100146480/1100327283" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A collection of photography from the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa, Okla. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A center dedicated to Bob Dylan prepares to open in Oklahoma

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097540966/1097540967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Maren Morris. Harper Smith/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Harper Smith/Courtesy of the artist

With 'Humble Quest,' Maren Morris is closely following her compass

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1088538247/1088720662" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Courtesy of the artist

The four 'SZNZ' of Weezer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1087173272/1087448567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stevie Wonder, photographed arriving in London on Jan. 25, 1974 — almost directly in the middle of what many refer to as the artist's "classic period." Dennis Oulds/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dennis Oulds/Getty Images

Half a century ago, Stevie Wonder defined what an 'artist's classic run' could mean

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1083730542/1083881307" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Don Van Cleave

Country singer Brent Cobb explores his faith on new gospel album

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1076306289/1076306290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What was the best album of 2021? It depends which critic you ask

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1068702046/1068702047" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jlin 22feetTribalWorldWide (Madhu Madhumita, photographer)/Team Wass hide caption

toggle caption
22feetTribalWorldWide (Madhu Madhumita, photographer)/Team Wass

'I don't think about the dance floor': Jlin's complicated rhythms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1060476653/1062615051" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NPR Music critic Ann Powers writes that Adele's new album, 30, "engages with the world — through lyrics that trade adolescent romanticism for genuine self-examination." Her new album, 30, is out now. Simon Emmett/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Simon Emmett/Courtesy of the artist

Adele talks coming back to Earth at '30'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056876397/1057133069" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Led Zeppelin performing at the Empire Pool in London. Michael Putland/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Putland/Getty Images

Under the thunder that opens Led Zeppelin's 'When the Levee Breaks'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1052880800/1053793701" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kacey Musgraves, whose follow-up to her Album of the Year-winning Golden Hour, titled Star-Crossed, was released Sep. 10, 2021. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Kacey Musgraves: 'Star-Crossed' And Thriving

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1035553570/1035814679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript