Phil Harrell Phil Harrell is a producer with Morning Edition.
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Phil Harrell

Phil Harrell

Producer, Morning Edition

Phil Harrell is a producer with Morning Edition, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine. He has been at NPR since 1999.

At NPR, Harrell has worked on a variety of shows and produced a little bit of everything—from politics to pop music. Most memorably, he worked through the nights after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster and after the death of President Ronald Reagan, producing mini-documentaries about each story for Weekend Edition.

Harrell got his start in radio as a rock 'n' roll DJ/program director at progressive WRNR in Annapolis, MD. He later co-created the Bob Edwards Show for XM and Bob Edwards Weekend for PRI.

Harrell has won numerous awards for his excellence in production. In 2006 and 2011, he led the teams that claimed the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Radio Broadcast Award. In addition, he won the Gabriel Award in both 2012 and 2014 with hosts Guy Raz and Arun Rath.

A native of Maryland, Harrell is a graduate of the University of Maryland-College Park.

Highlights from Phil Harrell:

Lowlights from Phil Harrell:

  • He almost killed Clint Eastwood by losing his balance and collapsing into him
  • He almost capsized a kayak paddled by NPR's Brian Naylor
  • He almost lost a recording that represented an entire day's worth of reporting in South Dakota
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Yusuf's Tea for the Tillerman 2 is a reimagining of his 1970 album as Cat Stevens. Rhys Fagan hide caption

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Rhys Fagan

Yusuf Revisits 'Tea For The Tillerman,' His Landmark Album As Cat Stevens

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Eddie Stubbs has been the voice of the Grand Ole Opry for 25 years, but July 29 will be his final broadcast. Rick Diamond/Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Diamond/Getty Images

Grand Ole Opry Announcer Eddie Stubbs To Retire

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Casey Kasem was the original host American Top 40, which premiered 50 years ago this week. Gary Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Friedman/Getty Images

50 Years Ago, Casey Kasem Began Counting Down The Hits On American Top 40

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Ronnie Dyson is remembered for his 1970 hit "Why Can't I Touch You" and starring in the Broadway musical Hair. Mark Anthony Neal argues that we overlook Dyson's influence as a transitional soul figure. Courtesy of Sony Music hide caption

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Courtesy of Sony Music

Ronnie Dyson: A Transitional Soul Figure Lost To Time

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Stan Ridgway of Wall of Voodoo performs in the band's video for "Mexican Radio." YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Combining Film Scores And Pop Rock, Wall Of Voodoo Was Not Just A One-Hit Wonder

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Love and Rockets, primarily known for its 1989 hit "So Alive," also helped establish a template for what became alternative rock with songs like "Yin and Yang (The Flowerpot Man)." Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Love And Rockets' Psychedelic Train Ride Laid The Foundation For Alt-Rock

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Neneh Cherry is mostly known in the US for her hit "Buffalo Stance." Author and professor Jayna Brown argues Cherry's recent songs like "Kong" show how an artist can mature over the years. Rafa Rivas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rafa Rivas/AFP via Getty Images

Letting Neneh Cherry Mature Past Her 1989 Pop Zeitgeist Moment

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Wajatta is a sort of musical odd couple: John Tejada (left) is a meticulous electronic composer and Reggie Watts (right) improvises all his music. Their album, Don't Let Get You Down, is out now. The1point8/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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The1point8/Courtesy of the artist

'Art Shouldn't Be Painful': How Wajatta Combines Improvisation And Production

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Mark Hollis was the lead singer of Talk Talk, a band known mostly for its 1984 hit "It's My Life." NPR's Guy Raz argues that Hollis' songwriting shines more on later tracks like "Ascension Day." Dr. Space / Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Dr. Space / Flickr Creative Commons

Revisiting Talk Talk, A Band Worried About Being A 'Laughing Stock'

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Percy Sledge never matched the height of his first hit, but Lauren Onkey frames it as less of a failure than an act of coming back down to size. Rick Diamond/Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Diamond/Getty Images

Synonymous With Soul, Percy Sledge Transcended The Muscle Shoals Sound

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Green Gartside of Scritti Politti, the band best known for the 1985 hit "Perfect Way." Music writer Maura Johnston argues that we should explore more of Gartside's work, which bridged punk and pop. Tom Sheehan /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tom Sheehan /Courtesy of the artist

Scritti Politti And The Punk/Pop Inflection Point

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Beyond Santana: Malo And The Forgotten Wave Of '70s Latin Rock Bands

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Marlena Shaw's music combines the devotional passion, the harmonic inventiveness and the spirit-led improvisation that we hear in both the gospel and jazz idioms. David D. Spitzer/Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture hide caption

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David D. Spitzer/Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

The Overlooked Activist Power Of Marlena Shaw

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Best known for the 1997 hit "Flagpole Sitta," Harvey Danger had much more to offer, argues NPR's Stephen Thompson. Scott Gries/Getty Images hide caption

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The Forgotten Wordplay And Songcraft Of Harvey Danger

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(L-R) Rick Richards, Bruce Smith and Fred McNeal of The Georgia Satellites perform onstage in 2018. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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The Georgia Satellites: A Southern Rock Band Lost To The MTV Era

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