Leah Donnella Leah Donnella is a news assistant on NPR's Code Switch team.
Caitlin Sanders/NPR
Leah Donnella 2016
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Leah Donnella

News Assistant, Code Switch

Leah Donnella is a news assistant on NPR's Code Switch team, where she primarily blogs and assists with the Code Switch podcast production.

Donnella originally came to NPR in September 2015 as an intern for Code Switch. Prior to that, she was a summer intern at WHYY's Public Media Commons, where she helped teach high school students the ins and outs of journalism and film-making. She spent a lot of time out in the hot Philly sun tracking down unsuspecting tourists for man-on-the-street interviews. Donnella also worked at the University of Pennsylvania for two years as the House Coordinator at Gregory College House, which is the University of Pennsylvania's language and cinema-themed dorm.

Donnella graduated from Pomona College with a Bachelor of Arts in Africana Studies.

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From left Bishop James Shannon, Rabbi Abraham Heschel, Dr. Martin Luther King and Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath. Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington Cemetery, February 6, 1968. Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Research Shows Black Boys Are Most Likely To Be Stuck In Cycle Of Poverty

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What Does It Mean To Be A 'Nation Of Immigrants'?

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What is love? Baby don't hurt me. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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In Search Of Black-On-Black Love

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People protest against President Trump in San Francisco. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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We Asked, You Answered: When Should We Call Something 'Racist'?

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"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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When The Parents Are White, The Child Is Black, And The Churches Are Segregated

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