Leah Donnella Leah Donnella is a news assistant on NPR's Code Switch team.
Caitlin Sanders/NPR
Leah Donnella 2016
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Leah Donnella

News Assistant, Code Switch

Leah Donnella is a news assistant on NPR's Code Switch team, where she primarily blogs and assists with the Code Switch podcast production.

Donnella originally came to NPR in September 2015 as an intern for Code Switch. Prior to that, she was a summer intern at WHYY's Public Media Commons, where she helped teach high school students the ins and outs of journalism and film-making. She spent a lot of time out in the hot Philly sun tracking down unsuspecting tourists for man-on-the-street interviews. Donnella also worked at the University of Pennsylvania for two years as the House Coordinator at Gregory College House, which is the University of Pennsylvania's language and cinema-themed dorm.

Donnella graduated from Pomona College with a Bachelor of Arts in Africana Studies.

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When The Parents Are White, The Child Is Black, And The Churches Are Segregated

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Melisande Short-Colomb, 63, is a descendant of slaves sold by the Jesuits to fund Georgetown University. She's enrolled as a freshman there and plans to major in African-American studies. Marvin Joseph/Getty Images hide caption

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Starting School At The University That Enslaved Her Ancestors

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A recent scuffle between an elotero and a pedestrian in Hollywood re-energized discussion about legalizing street vending in California. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

'I'm Not A Racist, I'm Argentine!'

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The past few weeks have revitalized debates across the country about what role Confederate monuments play in commemorating U.S. history. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What Our Monuments (Don't) Teach Us About Remembering The Past

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Code Switch is tackling your trickiest questions about race relations. amathers/iStock hide caption

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How To Talk Race With Your Family: Ask Code Switch

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Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other demonstrators encircle counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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