Barry Gordemer Barry Gordemer is an award-winning producer, editor, and director for NPR's Morning Edition.
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Barry Gordemer

Country singer Mickey Guyton released her latest album, Remember Her Name, on Sept. 24. Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording A hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording A

On Debut Album, Mickey Guyton Remembers Her Name

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This combination of satellite images provided by the National Hurricane Center shows the 30 named storms that developed during the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season. National Hurricane Center via AP hide caption

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National Hurricane Center via AP

The 2021 Hurricane Season Won't Use Greek Letters For Storms

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Watch The Winners Of The 'Dance Your Ph.D' Contest Make Cloud Formation Catchy

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Four-year-old Lois Copley-Jones, the photographer's daughter, takes part in a livestreamed broadcast of "PE With Joe" on March 23, 2020, in Newcastle-under-Lyme, England. The popular fitness series ended Friday. Gareth Copley/Getty Images hide caption

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Gareth Copley/Getty Images

As Schools Reopen, Popular 'PE With Joe' Online Exercise Class Goes Bye-Bye

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Artist Don Becker creates automatons after being laid off from his job during the pandemic. This mechanical sculpture features a woodcutter being thwarted by trees. Barry Gordemer/NPR hide caption

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Barry Gordemer/NPR

Automatons Keep Gears Turning In D.C. Artist's Brain During The Pandemic

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A screenshot of Blaseball's interactive story. Blaseball hide caption

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Blaseball

Baseball Fans Rule In An Online Game Made For Pandemic Times

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Gretchen Goldman shared this behind-the-scenes photo on Twitter of what it's like to work from home and parent during the pandemic. Gretchen Goldman hide caption

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Gretchen Goldman

When A Tornado Hits A Toy Store: Photo Shows Reality Of Working From Home With Kids

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Ants on a Log members Julie Be and Anya Rose helped curate a new album that affirms the experiences of transgender and nonbinary kids. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

A New Children's Album Celebrates Kids Who Are Transgender And Nonbinary

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Carlos Rodriguez (left), Ashley Robinson, Nick Schlatz and Haley Watts are front-line workers who shared their insight for 2020 graduates. Carlos Rodriguez, Ashley Robinson, Nick Schlatz and Haley Watts hide caption

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Carlos Rodriguez, Ashley Robinson, Nick Schlatz and Haley Watts

Listen: Ashley Robinson reads her graduation message

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A staff photo taken during the early days of Morning Edition. Co-host Bob Edwards is in the back row, standing seventh from the left among the three men in glasses. His co-host, Barbara Hoctor, sits on the table at right, holding a mug. Hoctor left the show after a few weeks. Edwards was host until 2004, when he went to SiriusXM. Stan Barouh/NPR hide caption

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Stan Barouh/NPR

'Morning Edition': The Radio News Show That Almost Wasn't

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The spacesuit Neil Armstrong wore on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission 50 years ago. Apollo 11 blasted off for the moon on July 16, 1969, and Armstrong took his famed "giant leap" five days later. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Of Little Details And Lunar Dust: Preserving Neil Armstrong's Apollo 11 Spacesuit

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Bruce Springsteen onstage during the Born in the U.S.A. Tour in 1984. Shinko Music/Getty Images hide caption

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Shinko Music/Getty Images

What Does 'Born In The U.S.A.' Really Mean?

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While your holiday meal might consist of turkey that's deep-fried, braised or roasted, the turkeys who've been featured in music through the years have inspired pop culture crazes. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

'Let's Turkey Trot': Festive Music About Fowl

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"The album is a good example of fixing things that I thought could be fixed," Paul Simon says. Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images

Paul Simon Tinkers With His Classics On 'In The Blue Light'

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