Rae Ellen Bichell Rae Bichell is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk.
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Rose Wong for NPR/KHN

A Hospital Charged More Than $700 For Each Push Of Medicine Through Her IV

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The Joy Of Receiving A COVID-19 Vaccine In A Nursing Home

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Colorado City Eyes Solution To Local News Desert: Libraries

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Researchers Examine Altitude's Role In Depression And Suicide

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Beer archaeologist Travis Rupp inspects his latest "Ale of Antiquity," George Washington Porter, surrounded by the oak barrels it fermented in at Avery Brewing Co. in Boulder, Colo. Dustin Hall/The Brewtography Project hide caption

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Dustin Hall/The Brewtography Project

Incident Meteorologist Works To Keep Fire Crews Safe

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Kim Ryu for NPR

Scientists Start To Tease Out The Subtler Ways Racism Hurts Health

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Rat traps are a weapon behind used to fight the plague in Madagascar, since the rodents carry the disease. But getting rid of all the rats would be difficult — and without rats, plague-infected fleas could then turn to humans for a blood meal. RIJASOLO/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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RIJASOLO/AFP/Getty Images

Workers spray to kill fleas in a public school in Antananarivo, Madagascar's capital. A bite from an infected flea can spread the plague, which has stricken 157 people in the island nation since August. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images