Rae Ellen Bichell Rae Bichell is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk.
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Rae Ellen Bichell

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Wednesday

When Caitlin Wells Salerno and Jon Salerno's first son, Hank, was born, his delivery cost the family only $30. Gus' bill came in at more than $16,000, all told — including the $2,755 ER charge. The family was responsible for about $3,600 of the total. Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN

A hospital hiked the price of a routine childbirth by calling it an 'emergency'

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Monday

Wednesday

The Joy Of Receiving A COVID-19 Vaccine In A Nursing Home

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Saturday

Colorado City Eyes Solution To Local News Desert: Libraries

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Monday

Researchers Examine Altitude's Role In Depression And Suicide

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Sunday

Beer archaeologist Travis Rupp inspects his latest "Ale of Antiquity," George Washington Porter, surrounded by the oak barrels it fermented in at Avery Brewing Co. in Boulder, Colo. Dustin Hall/The Brewtography Project hide caption

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Dustin Hall/The Brewtography Project

Wednesday

Incident Meteorologist Works To Keep Fire Crews Safe

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Friday

Wednesday

Sunday

Wednesday

Saturday

Kim Ryu for NPR

Scientists Start To Tease Out The Subtler Ways Racism Hurts Health

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Thursday

Rat traps are a weapon behind used to fight the plague in Madagascar, since the rodents carry the disease. But getting rid of all the rats would be difficult — and without rats, plague-infected fleas could then turn to humans for a blood meal. RIJASOLO/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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RIJASOLO/AFP/Getty Images

Saturday

Wednesday

Workers spray to kill fleas in a public school in Antananarivo, Madagascar's capital. A bite from an infected flea can spread the plague, which has stricken 157 people in the island nation since August. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Friday

Strike 2: Our second attempt at illustrating the plague story — with what we said was a 15th-century image by Jacopo Oddi from the La Franceschina codex depicting Franciscan monks treating victims of the plague in Italy — is about leprosy. A. Dagli Orti/Getty Images hide caption

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A. Dagli Orti/Getty Images

Sunday

Although consuming cannabis is legal in Colorado and several other states, driving while under the influence of the drug is not. Nick Pedersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Pedersen/Getty Images

Scientists Still Seek A Reliable DUI Test For Marijuana

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Thursday

The defensive mucus of the Arion subfuscus slug has inspired materials scientists trying to invent better medical adhesives. Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images hide caption

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Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images

Slug Slime Inspires Scientists To Invent Sticky Surgical Glue

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Thursday

Crew members on one of the simulated Mars missions this spring included Pitchayapa Jingjit (from left), Becky Parker, Elijah Espinoza and Esteban Ramirez. Community college students and teachers in real life, the team members spent a week in the Utah desert, partly to experience the isolation and challenges of a real trip to Mars. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Prepare For Mars Settlement, Simulated Missions Explore Utah's Desert

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Saturday

A double set of fences topped with barbed wire circles this outdoor decomposition site outside Grand Junction, Colo. The barrier thwarts prying eyes and protects the curious from an unpleasant surprise. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Solve Gruesome Desert Mysteries, Scientists Become Body Collectors

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Thursday

Monday

Sonia Vallabh lost her mother to a rare brain disease in 2010, and then learned she had inherited the same genetic mutation. She and her husband, Eric Minikel, went back to school to study the family of illnesses — prion diseases — in the hope of finding a cure for Sonia. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

A Couple's Quest To Stop A Rare Disease Before It Takes One Of Them

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Kamni Vallabh helps her daughter Sonia get ready for her wedding, a few months before Kamni started showing symptoms of the prion disease that would kill her. Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh hide caption

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Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh

A Mother's Early Death Drives Her Daughter To Find A Treatment

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