Ravenna Koenig Ravenna Koenig is a producer for Weekend Edition.
Stories By

Ravenna Koenig

Ravenna Koenig

Producer, Weekend Edition

Ravenna Koenig is a producer and director for Weekend Edition. Before joining the show, she interned at WNYC's On The Media and Benjamen Walker's Theory of Everything podcast. Since joining Weekend Edition in 2014, she has produced interviews with a diverse range of guests including Charli XCX, Mark Morris, Brie Larson, Ibeyi, and Sandra Cisneros. Her reported work has also been featured on NPR, with a focus on arts and culture. During the 2016 presidential cycle, Ravenna has field-produced stories on the election and was part of a team that produced Morning Edition's documentary special about how Americans see President Obama's time in office. Her hometown is an island near Seattle, and while she doesn't miss the rain, she does miss the feeling of wonder after 30 straight days of it.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

A reindeer calf scratches its head with its hoof. Their ability to move their bodies into extreme positions was one of the reasons owner Jane Atkinson thought that reindeer would be a good fit for a yoga class. Ravenna Koenig/KTOO hide caption

toggle caption
Ravenna Koenig/KTOO

Move Over, Goat Yoga. Alaskans Now Have Reindeer Yoga

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733849625/735005903" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trump Accused Of Moving Too Fast With Plans To Drill For Oil In Alaska

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691521579/691521580" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Robin Mongoyak and his young son enjoy the sunshine out on the southern edge of Utqiaġvik. Ravenna Koenig/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

toggle caption
Ravenna Koenig/Alaska's Energy Desk

After 2 Months, The Sun Rises In The Northernmost U.S. Town

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/690731778/691058318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Waves crash on the shore of Utqiaġvik in late October. Billy Adams, who has lived in the Arctic town his whole life, says that when he was growing up, by October there was almost always enough ice attached to shore that he could go hunting ringed seals on it. Ravenna Koenig / Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

toggle caption
Ravenna Koenig / Alaska's Energy Desk

How A Shorter Sea Ice Season Is Changing Life In The Arctic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/672100740/675070473" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the Beaufort Sea off the coast of Alaska, global warming is melting sea ice and glaciers at an historic rate. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Geese, ducks and swans at Creamer's Field Migratory Waterfowl Refuge in Fairbanks, Alaska on April 26. The refuge is a stopover for many migratory birds heading north and west to their nesting grounds, and their arrival is one of the signs of spring in the area. Ravenna Koenig/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

toggle caption
Ravenna Koenig/Alaska's Energy Desk

Springtime Weather Finally Warms Up Inland Alaska

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/608548913/608868193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Charlene Aleck, an elected councilor of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation in British Columbia stands across the shore from the terminus of the Trans Mountain Pipeline. Ian Stewart/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ian Stewart/NPR

Canada's Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Faces Opposition

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/560475404/560660190" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Activist and migrants of the Casa del Migrante de Ciudad Juarez and Comite de Solidaridad para los Migrantes Detenidos protest for the deaths of migrants on a trailer in Texas last week, at Paso del Norte International Bridge in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, on July 28, 2017. HERIKA MARTINEZ/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
HERIKA MARTINEZ/AFP/Getty Images

It may look nondescript now, but New Orleans' Congo Square is where the musical foundations of jazz were laid down. Kevin McCaffrey/Courtesy of "A Closer Walk" hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin McCaffrey/Courtesy of "A Closer Walk"

In New Orleans, There's A Piece Of Music History Around Every Corner

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537224556/537381272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald in 1947 in Iowa, where she went to nursing school. Courtesy of Ray Gruenewald hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Ray Gruenewald

Graduating High School At 92

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534286490/534286491" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bedouine's self-titled debut album is out now. Polly Antonia Barrowman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Polly Antonia Barrowman/Courtesy of the artist

On Her Quiet Folk Debut, Bedouine Wanders And Wonders

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533795115/534207583" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jason Haaheim is principal timpanist with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. Justin Haaheim/Courtesy of Jason Haaheim hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Haaheim/Courtesy of Jason Haaheim

Meet The Nanotechnologist Behind The Timpani At The Met

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533211998/533327646" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In her new album as Fiver, Simone Schmidt imagines the songs that might have been sung by women incarcerated at Ontario's Rockwood Asylum in the 19th century. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

A Songwriter Gives Voice To The Silenced Women Of Rockwood Asylum

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528159983/528335350" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Feist says her goal with Pleasure is to "[go] back to a place that would be sustainable, that I can imagine enjoying when I'm 90." /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
/Courtesy of the artist

Feist Has A Message For Her 71-Year-Old Self

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527109174/527250452" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript