Rob Schmitz Rob Schmitz is the Shanghai Correspondent for NPR.
Julian de Hauteclocque Howe/NPR
Rob Schmitz 2016
Julian de Hauteclocque Howe/NPR

Rob Schmitz

Correspondent, Shanghai

Rob Schmitz is the Shanghai Correspondent for NPR.

From 2010 to 2016, Schmitz was the China Correspondent for the public radio business program Marketplace. Schmitz has won several awards for his reporting on China, including two national Edward R. Murrow awards and an Education Writers Association award. His work was also a finalist for the 2012 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award. His reporting in Japan — from the hardest-hit areas near the failing Fukushima nuclear power plant following the earthquake and tsunami — was included in the publication 100 Great Stories, celebrating the centennial of Columbia University's Journalism School. In 2012, Rob exposed the fabrications in Mike Daisey's account of Apple's supply chain on This American Life. His report was featured in the show's "Retraction" episode, the most downloaded episode in the program's 16-year history.

Prior to his radio career, Schmitz lived and worked in China – first as a teacher for the Peace Corps in the 1990s, later as a freelance print and video journalist. He speaks Mandarin and Spanish. He has a Master's degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Schmitz's latest book is Street of Eternal Happiness: Big City Dreams Along a Shanghai Road (2016).

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Story Archive

Some North Koreans Puzzled By U.S. Call For Denuclearization

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News Brief: Kavanaugh Latest, Brexit, Koreas Summit

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South Korean President Moon Jae-in (left) and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un shake hands after signing a joint declaration at the Paekhwawon State Guesthouse in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Wednesday. Pyongyang Press Corps Pool via AP hide caption

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Pyongyang Press Corps Pool via AP

North Korea's Kim Jong Un Says He Will Visit Seoul

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Leaders Of North And South Korea Meet In Pyongyang For 3rd Summit

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North And South Korean Leaders Set To Meet For Third Time This Year

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North Korea's Kim Set To Host South Korea's Moon

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Pigs in a pen in a village in Linquan County, China. Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media via Getty Images

A Deadly Virus Threatens Millions Of Pigs In China

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How Trump's Latest Threatened Tariffs Could Affect China And Its Leadership

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As Trade Talks Resume, U.S. To Slap China With New Round Of Tariffs

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Google Plans For a Censored Search Engine In China

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30-year-old Dai Xuan, who works as the editor of a luxury magazine in Shanghai – and is pictured at the helm of a private jet - says the reason why she hasn't married yet is economic. She says she loves her job and she makes more than enough to support herself, which has made her pickier about who she dates. NPR hide caption

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China's Marriage Rate Plummets As Women Choose To Stay Single Longer

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Why Young Chinese Aren't Rushing Into Marriage

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Reports Suggest Children Throughout China Likely Injected With Faulty Vaccines

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A newborn girl is the first baby born in the New Year at Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Hospital on January 1, 2018 in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province of China. VCG/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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Trade War With China Heats Up

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