Meg Anderson Meg Anderson is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team.
Meg Anderson - 2019
Stories By

Meg Anderson

Elissa Nadworny/NPR
Meg Anderson - 2019
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Meg Anderson

Assistant Producer, Investigations

Meg Anderson is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team. She helps shape the team's groundbreaking work for radio, digital and social platforms. She served as a producer on the Peabody Award-winning series Lost Mothers, which investigated the high rate of maternal mortality in the United States. She also contributes her own original reporting to the team, including the series Heat and Health in American Cities, which investigated the link between heat, health and poverty in cities across the country. That series won the National Press Foundation Innovative Storytelling Award and an honorable mention for the Philip Meyer Journalism Award. She also completed a fellowship as a local reporter for WAMU, the public radio station for Washington, D.C. Before joining the investigations team, she was an integral part of NPR's 2016 election team and also had brief stints on NPR's Morning Edition and the Education desk. Her roots are in the Midwest, where she graduated with a Master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Thousands of people marched in Washington, D.C., to protest the death of George Floyd. The show of law enforcement at the protest Saturday appeared lighter in comparison with other recent demonstrations in which large contingents of police and National Guard troops were deployed. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eman Mohammed for NPR

Dr. Ray Lorenzoni is in his second year of a pediatric cardiology fellowship at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. In March, he was recruited to treat adult COVID-19 patients during New York City's peak. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elias Williams for NPR

'She Wasn't Alone,' A Doctor Reflects On New York City's Coronavirus Peak

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/852719312/857636448" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medical workers prepare to use a swab to administer a coronavirus test at a drive-through center on March 21 in Jericho, N.Y. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Despite Early Warnings, U.S. Took Months To Expand Swab Production For COVID-19 Test

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/853930147/854879139" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amid Pandemic, Hospitals Lay Off 1.4M Workers In April

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/853524764/853524765" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As part of a demonstration across from the White House on May 7, National Nurses United set out empty shoes for nurses who have died from COVID-19. The union is asking employers and the government to provide safe workplaces, including adequate staffing. Hospitals have been laying off and furloughing nurses due to lost revenue. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

As Hospitals Lose Revenue, More Than A Million Health Care Workers Lose Jobs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/852435761/852527761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Bank of America sign is displayed at a branch in New York on April 10, 2020. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Small Business Rescue Earned Banks $10 Billion In Fees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/840678984/840717921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump speaks during a news conference about the coronavirus pandemic in the Rose Garden of the White House on March 13. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Month After Emergency Declaration, Trump's Promises Largely Unfulfilled

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/832797592/833010492" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Pier 39 employee wears protective gear while cleaning a sidewalk in San Francisco, Calif., on March 16, the day the county announced a local shelter-in-place order. On March 19, California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a shelter-in-place order for the entire state. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Want To See What Your City's Pandemic Plan Says? Good Luck.

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/820104179/826327299" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A screen grab from a social media video shows a tornado tearing through Jonesboro, Ark., on Saturday. Said Said/Triples S Phone and Computer Repair/via REUTERS hide caption

toggle caption
Said Said/Triples S Phone and Computer Repair/via REUTERS

In Manhattan, a makeshift morgue is set up next to Lenox Health Greenwich Village. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

President Trump speaks at the White House about the U.S. response to the spread of the novel coronavirus. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images