Meg Anderson Meg Anderson is an editor on NPR's Investigations team.
Meg Anderson - 2019
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Meg Anderson

Elissa Nadworny/NPR
Meg Anderson - 2019
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Meg Anderson

Editor, Investigations

Meg Anderson is a reporter and editor on NPR's Investigations team. She reported the award-winning series Heat and Health in American Cities, which illustrated how low-income neighborhoods nationwide are often hotter in temperature than their wealthier counterparts. She also investigated the roots of a COVID-19 outbreak in a predominantly Black retirement home, and the failures of the Department of Justice to release at-risk prisoners to safer settings during the pandemic. She serves as a producer and editor for the investigations team, including on the Peabody Award-winning series Lost Mothers, which investigated the high rate of maternal mortality in the United States. She has also reported for NPR's politics and education desks, and for WAMU, the local Member station in Washington, D.C. Her roots are in the Midwest, where she graduated with a Master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

Story Archive

Ron Shehee had been at the federal prison complex in Lompoc, Calif., only a few months when the pandemic struck. Meron Menghistab for NPR hide caption

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Meron Menghistab for NPR

As COVID spread in federal prisons, many at-risk inmates tried and failed to get out

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In the year since the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol, federal prosecutors have charged more than 700 people related to the attack. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

5 takeaways from the Capitol riot criminal cases, one year later

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Right-Wing Demonstrators Gather At The Capitol In Support Of The Jan. 6 Rioters

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Rioters clash with police as they push barricades to storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Stickers reading "Fck Antifa" are stuck on a broken window at the U.S. Capitol after the building was breached by rioters on Jan. 6. Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Antifa Didn't Storm The Capitol. Just Ask The Rioters.

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Larry Rendall Brock Jr., an Air Force veteran, is seen inside the Senate Chamber wearing a military-style helmet and tactical vest during the rioting at the U.S. Capitol. Federal prosecutors have alleged that before the attack, Brock posted on Facebook about an impending "Second Civil War." Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Defendants In Capitol Riot Cases Served In The Military

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Ernestine Mann, here in a family photo, moved into the Arbor Terrace at Cascade assisted living facility in Atlanta in 2019. Mann was one of the residents who died of COVID-19 this year when there was an outbreak at the facility. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

In Atlanta, A Wave Of Coronavirus Deaths And The Questions Left In Its Wake

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What Went Wrong At Arbor Terrace

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You don't need a ton of gear to get started biking regularly. It's an activity that gives you a sense of freedom at any age. Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Heading back to work? Biking is a great way to get there

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Thousands of people marched in Washington, D.C., to protest the death of George Floyd. The show of law enforcement at the protest Saturday appeared lighter in comparison with other recent demonstrations in which large contingents of police and National Guard troops were deployed. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

Dr. Ray Lorenzoni is in his second year of a pediatric cardiology fellowship at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. In March, he was recruited to treat adult COVID-19 patients during New York City's peak. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

'She Wasn't Alone,' A Doctor Reflects On New York City's Coronavirus Peak

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