Meg Anderson Meg Anderson is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team.
Meg Anderson - 2019
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Meg Anderson

Elissa Nadworny/NPR
Meg Anderson - 2019
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Meg Anderson

Meg Anderson is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team, where she helps shape the team's groundbreaking work for radio, digital and social platforms. She served as a producer on the Peabody Award-winning series Lost Mothers, which investigated the high rate of maternal mortality in the U.S., and she has also completed a fellowship as a local reporter for WAMU, the public radio station for Washington, D.C. Before joining the investigations team, she was an integral part of NPR's 2016 election team and also had brief stints on NPR's Morning Edition and education desk. Her roots are in the Midwest, where she graduated with a Master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

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Story Archive

News Brief: Bahamas Recovery, Vitamin E And Vaping, City Heat And Poverty

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A tree grows beneath a power line in the Park DuValle neighborhood of Louisville, Ky. Urban environments can be especially harsh on trees. Sean McMinn/NPR hide caption

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Sean McMinn/NPR

Trees Are Key To Fighting Urban Heat — But Cities Keep Losing Them

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Sean McMinn/NPR

As Rising Heat Bakes U.S. Cities, The Poor Often Feel It Most

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Photos of Ethan Saylor are displayed on his mother's kitchen table. Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

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Meg Anderson/NPR

How One Mother's Battle Is Changing Police Training On Disabilities

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California Attorney General Xavier Becerra was tapped to give the Spanish language response to the president's State of the Union address by top congressional Democratic leaders. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

Students And Neighbors Of Christine Blasey Ford Discuss The Woman They Know

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6, the third day of his confirmation hearing to replace retired Justice Anthony Kennedy. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Millions of Americans struggle to afford their rent and most don't get any help at all. In Dallas, the city and a prominent landlord are the latest moving pieces in this problem. Allison V. Smith for KERA hide caption

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Allison V. Smith for KERA

Choosing Between Squalor Or The Street: Housing Without Government Aid

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Farryn Giles and her son Isaiah, 6, walk in their east Dallas neighborhood. While she received a Section 8 voucher to help them move to a neighborhood with more opportunities, finding an apartment that would take the voucher was challenging. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Section 8 Vouchers Help The Poor — But Only If Housing Is Available

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The $25 million Labre Place in Miami was built using the low-income housing tax credit program. It's named for the patron saint for the homeless and is now home to 90 low-income residents, about half of whom were once homeless. Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS) hide caption

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Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS)

Affordable Housing Program Costs More, Shelters Fewer

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Sen. Cory Booker (left) reads a statement speaking out against Attorney General nominee Jeff Sessions during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. Sitting with Booker is Rep. John Lewis. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images