Meg Anderson Meg Anderson is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team.
Meg Anderson - 2019
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Meg Anderson

Elissa Nadworny/NPR
Meg Anderson - 2019
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Meg Anderson

Assistant Producer, Investigations

Meg Anderson is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team. She helps shape the team's groundbreaking work for radio, digital and social platforms. She served as a producer on the Peabody Award-winning series Lost Mothers, which investigated the high rate of maternal mortality in the United States. She also contributes her own original reporting to the team, including the series Heat and Health in American Cities, which investigated the link between heat, health and poverty in cities across the country. That series won the National Press Foundation Innovative Storytelling Award and an honorable mention for the Philip Meyer Journalism Award. She also completed a fellowship as a local reporter for WAMU, the public radio station for Washington, D.C. Before joining the investigations team, she was an integral part of NPR's 2016 election team and also had brief stints on NPR's Morning Edition and the Education desk. Her roots are in the Midwest, where she graduated with a Master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

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Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, speaks during a House Judiciary Committee markup. She delivered the Spanish-language response to President Trump's State of the Union address Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Alleged Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (far left) consults with his defense attorneys in the U.S. military courtroom in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, as a man who waterboarded him, retired Air Force psychologist James Mitchell, takes the stand. Janet Hamlin Illustration hide caption

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Janet Hamlin Illustration

Vacant rowhouses line a portion of Franklin Square, a formerly redlined neighborhood in Baltimore. New research shows many communities subjected to discriminatory housing practices in the 1930s are hotter today. Ian Morton for NPR hide caption

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Ian Morton for NPR

Racist Housing Practices From The 1930s Linked To Hotter Neighborhoods Today

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Evo Morales, Bolivia's president, speaks during a press conference in El Alto, Bolivia, on Nov. 9, 2019. Morales resigned the next day after protests and allegations of election fraud. Marcelo Perez del Carpio/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Perez del Carpio/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In managing the contract, Microsoft will be responsible for storing massive amounts of sensitive military data and giving the U.S. military access to technologies like artificial intelligence. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

News Brief: Bahamas Recovery, Vitamin E And Vaping, City Heat And Poverty

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A tree grows beneath a power line in the Park DuValle neighborhood of Louisville, Ky. Urban environments can be especially harsh on trees. Sean McMinn/NPR hide caption

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Sean McMinn/NPR

Trees Are Key To Fighting Urban Heat — But Cities Keep Losing Them

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Sean McMinn/NPR

As Rising Heat Bakes U.S. Cities, The Poor Often Feel It Most

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Photos of Ethan Saylor are displayed on his mother's kitchen table. Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

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Meg Anderson/NPR

How One Mother's Battle Is Changing Police Training On Disabilities

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California Attorney General Xavier Becerra was tapped to give the Spanish language response to the president's State of the Union address by top congressional Democratic leaders. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP