Parth Shah Parth Shah is a producer and reporter at NPR.
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Parth Shah

Parth Shah

Producer/Reporter

Parth Shah is a producer and reporter in the Programming department at NPR. He came to NPR in 2016 as a Kroc Fellow.

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Alexandra Bowman for NPR

Honoring Your Heritage — And Improving Your Health — Through Food

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A Uyghur woman protests the detainment of Uyghur citizens following ethnic unrest in the Xinjiang region, China. Guang Niu/Getty Images hide caption

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Guang Niu/Getty Images

James Baldwin poses while at home in Saint Paul de Vence, South of France during September of 1985. Ulf Andersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulf Andersen/Getty Images

Earth Day on April 20, 1970 in New York, New York. Santi Visalli/Getty Images hide caption

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Santi Visalli/Getty Images

The Black Panthers march in protest of the trial of co-founder Huey P. Newton in Oakland, California. Bettmann/Getty hide caption

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Bettmann/Getty

A line of policeman take aim. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Yuri Kochiyama speaks at an anti-war demonstration in New York City's Central Park around 1968. Courtesy of the Kochiyama family/UCLA Asian American Studies Center hide caption

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Courtesy of the Kochiyama family/UCLA Asian American Studies Center

Illustration of Luxurious American Pullman Dining Car, 1877. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Xuanyu Han Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A plague doctor in protective clothing. The beak mask was filled with incense thought to purify air and the cane was used to avoid touching patients. Artwork by Paul Furst. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Joelle Avelino

Octavia Butler: Visionary Fiction‬

A special episode from our friends at NPR's history podcast Throughline: Octavia Butler's alternate realities and 'speculative fiction' reveal striking, and often devastating parallels to the world we live in today. She was a deep observer of the human condition, perplexed and inspired by our propensity towards self-destruction. But along with her warning is her message of hope - a hope conjured by centuries of survival and persistence. For every society that perishes in her books comes a story of rebuilding, of repair.

Octavia Butler: Visionary Fiction‬

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The Course of Empire (1836) by Thomas Cole. VCG Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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VCG Wilson/Getty Images

Former President Donal Trump speaks from a Jumbotron screen as crowds gather for the "Stop the Steal" rally just before a mob descended on the Capitol. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Police clash with supporters of US President Donald Trump who breached security and entered the Capitol building in Washington D.C. Mostafa Bassim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Mostafa Bassim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson in the Senate on March 13, 1868. The House approved 11 articles of impeachment against Andrew Johnson. After a 74-day Senate trial, the Senate acquitted Johnson on three of the articles by a one-vote margin each and decided not to vote on the remaining articles. Library of Congress/Getty Images hide caption

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Library of Congress/Getty Images