Audie Cornish Audie Cornish is a co-host of All Things Considered.
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Audie Cornish

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Audie Cornish, NPR
Eslah Attar/NPR

Audie Cornish

Host, All Things Considered

Audie Cornish is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Previously, she served as host of Weekend Edition Sunday. Prior to moving into that host position in the fall of 2011, Cornish reported from Capitol Hill for NPR News, covering issues and power in both the House and Senate and specializing in financial industry policy. She was part of NPR's six-person reporting team during the 2008 presidential election, and had a featured role in coverage of the Democratic National Convention in Denver.

Cornish comes to Washington, D.C., from Nashville, where she covered the South for NPR, including many the Gulf states left reeling by the 2005 hurricane season. She has also covered the aftermath of other disasters, including the deaths of several miners in West Virginia in 2006, as well as the tornadoes that struck Tennessee in 2006 and Alabama in 2007.

Before coming to NPR, Cornish was a reporter for Boston's award-winning public radio station WBUR. There she covered some of the region's major news stories, including the legalization of same sex marriage, the sexual abuse scandal in the Boston Roman Catholic Archdiocese, as well as Boston's hosting of the Democratic National Convention. Cornish also reported for WBUR's syndicated programming including On Point, distributed by NPR, and Here and Now.

In 2005, Cornish shared in a first prize in the National Awards for Education Writing for "Reading, Writing, and Race," a study of the achievement gap. She is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists.

Cornish has served as a reporter for the Associated Press in Boston. She graduated from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

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The International Sweethearts of Rhythm in the 1940s. Courtesy of Rosalind Cron hide caption

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Courtesy of Rosalind Cron

The All-Female Big Bands That Made History During World War II

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We Offer Some Pop Culture Advice

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Rebecca Bunch (Rachel Bloom) in Crazy-Ex Girlfriend. Erica Parise/The CW hide caption

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Erica Parise/The CW

Valerie Jarrett, a former Obama administration staffer, has a new book titled, Finding My Voice. Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage

Obama Adviser Valerie Jarrett Defends Biden, Talks 2020 In Conversation About Memoir

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Maren Morris steps forward with confidence, drive and R&B-country hybrids with her sophomore album, GIRL. Jamie Nelson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jamie Nelson/Courtesy of the artist

Maren Morris Grows Into Her Own: 'I'm A Little Bit Of Everything'

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux

David Means, Defender Of The Short Story, On His 'Instructions For A Funeral'

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A Year Later, West Virginia Educators Reflect On Strike And What's Changed

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Duke Ellington at the piano, circa 1940. John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images hide caption

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John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images

A Sprawling Blueprint For Protest Music, Courtesy Of The Jazz Duke

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Glenn Close plays Joan, the titular wife in The Wife. The role has earned her an Academy Award nomination for best actress. Graeme Hunter/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Graeme Hunter/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Well Before 'The Wife,' Glenn Close Was Ready For Her Close-Up

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DNA, the ninth album of the Backstreet Boys, is due out Jan. 25. Dennis Leupold/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Dennis Leupold/Courtesy of the artist

Backstreet Boys On Fatherhood, Addiction And New (Grammy-Nominated) Music

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Nick Sandmann, a student from Covington Catholic High School, stands in front of Nathan Phillips, a Native American, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Kaya Taitano/Social Media/Reuters hide caption

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Kaya Taitano/Social Media/Reuters

The Fight For Native Voices To Be Heard

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'Field Guide To The North American Teenager' Taps Into The Raw Anxiety Of Adolescence

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Though he is best-known for his auteur work, composer, playwright and actor Lin-Manuel Miranda says it was his dream to be offered a part in someone else's musical. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Lin-Manuel Miranda On 'Mary Poppins Returns' And Writing His Way Onstage

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The Moral Of The Story Is: Great Kids' Books Don't Always Need Morals

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In The Front Runner, Hugh Jackman plays Gary Hart, whose 1987 presidential campaign was swiftly derailed by reports of an extramarital affair. Frank Masi/Sony Pictures hide caption

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What 'The Front Runner' And Gary Hart Tell Us About Political Theater Today

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