Audie Cornish Audie Cornish is a co-host of All Things Considered.
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Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo says the U.S. is clear "clear-eyed on the magnitude of the threat that China poses." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo: U.S. Devising Strategy To Push Back On China

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A family wearing face masks and holding signs take part in a rally "Love Our Communities: Build Collective Power" to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence, at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo in Los Angeles, California, on March 13. Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images

How To Start Conversations About Anti-Asian Racism With Your Family

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Attorney Ben Crump speaks during a press conference at the site where George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis. Crump has represented numerous families of people killed by police. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

George Floyd Family Lawyer Ben Crump: Trial Is A Chance For Justice

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What's Mine and Yours, by Naima Coster Grand Central hide caption

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Grand Central

2 Determined Mothers Clash Over Integration Efforts In 'What's Mine And Yours'

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A teacher wearing a protective mask walks around the classroom during a lesson at an elementary school in San Francisco in October 2020. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

3 Teachers On The Push To Return To The Classroom

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A Moroccan nurse holds a syringe containing a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Jan. 29. Morocco is one of the many countries that will receive COVID-19 doses as part of the COVAX initiative. Fadel Senna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fadel Senna/AFP via Getty Images

Global Initiative To Start Shipping Vaccines To Africa, Where Supplies Are Low

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Demonstrators call for a union and $15 minimum wage at a McDonald's in Charleston, S.C., in February 2020. The U.S. Senate has voted to prohibit an increase in the federal minimum wage during the pandemic. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Senate Says No To $15 Minimum Wage For Now, But Democrats Vow To Push On

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In Matt de la Peña's Love, a child comes downstairs to find the whole family gathered around the television. "When you ask what happened, they answer with silence and shift between you and the screen." In Love, de la Peña couches fearful moments in the context of love and protection. Text copyright © 2018 Matt de la Peña Illustrations copyright © 2018 Loren Long G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers hide caption

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G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers

Struggling To Discuss Tough Topics With A Kid? Here Are Books That Might Help

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Psychologist Gaurav Suri says public health officials need to tailor their messages to appeal to a wide range of people. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

Busta Rhymes' latest album is Extinction Level Event 2: The Wrath of God. Flo Ngala/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Flo Ngala/Courtesy of the artist

Busta Rhymes On 'Extinction Level Event 2' And Hip-Hop As A Daily Practice

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Medical staff treat a patient in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston on Nov. 10. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Getty Images

'You Can See The Regret': ICU Nurse On Patients Who Failed To Take COVID Precautions

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Archbishop of Washington Wilton D. Gregory delivers his homily at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception on May 21, 2019 in Washington, D.C. Pope Francis named Gregory as a future cardinal this week. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Archbishop Wilton Gregory Says 'Carry On' Work For Racial And Societal Justice

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Why More White Voters May Not Support Trump In 2020

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks on March 2 during a press conference to discuss the first positive case of coronavirus in New York state. Angela Weiss /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss /AFP via Getty Images

In 'American Crisis,' New York Gov. Cuomo Gives Halftime Review Of Pandemic Response

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How Have American Billionaires Gotten Richer Despite Pandemic Recession?

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