Jessica Diaz-Hurtado
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Jessica Diaz-Hurtado

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Don't mistake the dreamlike quality of Empress Of's music for a lighthearted approach to reality. Her lyrics make powerful statements about identity. Fabian Guerrero/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Fabian Guerrero/Courtesy of the artist

Guest DJ: Empress Of Plays Sing-Along With Some Of Her Greatest Influences

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This portrait of a woman from El Salvador reflects the wariness and uncertainty discussed in Alt.Latino this week. Jessica Alvarenga/Witness The Isthmus/ Jessica Alvarenga hide caption

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Jessica Alvarenga/Witness The Isthmus/ Jessica Alvarenga

Amidst Political Tumult, Salvadoran Artists Across The Country Discuss Their Work

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Cuban vocalist Danay Suárez's "Tú Serás" was among our picks of favorite songs from 2017. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Alt.Latino's Favorites: The Songs Of 2017

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Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee perform onstage at the Billboard Latin Music Awards. Sergi Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergi Alexander/Getty Images

'Despacito' Deep Dive: More Than Meets The Ear

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Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee performing "Despacito" onstage at the Billboard Latin Music Awards 2017. Sergi Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergi Alexander/Getty Images

What's Behind The Success Of 'Despacito'?

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Canvasser Ana Mejia gathers her supplies at the offices of the National Council of La Raza in Miami in 2016. The NCLR renamed itself UnidosUS this month, causing a rift in the U.S. Latino community. Some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

The Largest U.S. Latino Advocacy Group Changes Its Name, Sparking Debate

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Baked crema Mexicana doughnuts with a blood orange glaze, as featured in the food blog Chicano Eats. On his bilingual blog, Esteban Castillo shares traditional and fusion Mexican recipes. The blog has a stunning, minimalist aesthetic meant to challenge the way people see Mexican food. Esteban Castillo hide caption

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Esteban Castillo

The Chulita Vinyl Club embraces old-school records and empowers young women. This is the Los Angeles chapter. Arlene Mejorado/Courtesy of Chulita Vinyl Club hide caption

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Arlene Mejorado/Courtesy of Chulita Vinyl Club

For The Chulita Vinyl Club, Crate Digging Is More Than A Hobby

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Nina Simone is featured on this week's episode of Alt.Latino celebrating International Women's Day. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images/Getty Images

Celebrating Mujeres: Butterflies, Brujas And Bey

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Sisters Bela Henriquez, left, and Nadiezhda Henriquez with their mother, Zulma Chacin de Henriquez, center, testified about how Giraldo Serna's drug operations destroyed their family. Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

As an Afro-Latina, Celia Cruz has impacted the music industry and world. Scott Gries/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Gries/Getty Images

Alt.Latino Extra: Being Unapologetic, Being Afro-Latina

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