Joe Neel Joe Neel is NPR's deputy senior supervising editor and a correspondent on the Science Desk.
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Tony Potts, a 69-year-old retiree living in Ormond Beach, Fla., receives his first injection earlier this year as a participant in a Phase 3 clinical trial of Moderna's COVID-19 candidate vaccine. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

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In Nashville, Tenn., a sign reminds visitors to wear masks at Belmont University, which is preparing to host Thursday's presidential debate. Federal health officials say a new study highlights the need for masks. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration headquarters in White Oak, Md. The agency this week has removed a top communications official in the wake of misleading claims it made about a treatment for COVID-19. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Trump has previously suggested that a combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin may help in the fight against the virus — but the Food and Drug Administration has strongly warned against taking hydroxychloroquine without medical monitoring. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A motorist gets a drive-through coronavirus test Thursday in Daly City, Calif. The U.S. has surpassed China to have the world's largest number of coronavirus cases. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President Trump turns away from Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, as she says she had a low-grade fever over the weekend and was tested for coronavirus. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

U.S. health officials are again urging people to stop vaping until experts figure out why some are coming down with serious respiratory illnesses. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

More testing for HIV infection is one of the steps needed to halt the spread of the virus. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Halting U.S. HIV Epidemic By 2030: Difficult But Doable

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