Joe Neel Joe Neel is NPR's deputy senior supervising editor and a correspondent on the Science Desk.
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Law enforcement and first responders gather outside Robb Elementary School following Tuesday's shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Their response has since come under wide scrutiny. Dario Lopez-Mills/AP hide caption

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Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

People arrive at a COVID-19 testing station in Houston, Texas, on Jan. 7. Texans were rushing to get tested as the state experienced an unprecedented spike in infections from the omicron variant. Francois Picard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Picard/AFP via Getty Images

Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine for young children is a lower-dose formulation of the companies' adult vaccine. It was found to be safe and nearly 91% effective at preventing COVID-19. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Ari Blank got a comforting hand-squeeze from his mom in May as he was vaccinated against COVID-19 in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. This week, the Food and Drug Administration authorized the use of Pfizer's vaccine in even younger kids — ages 5 to 11. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images
Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR

NPR poll: The delta surge pushed Americans further behind in all walks of life

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A pupil wearing a face mask reads instructions for a coronavirus rapid test kit at the start of a lesson at an elementary school in Berlin on August 9, 2021. Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images

A health care worker fills a syringe with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City this year. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

A COVID-19 vaccine dose is prepared at a pharmacy in Baton Rouge, La., on Aug. 17. About 14 million people received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in August. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A nurse fills a syringe with Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic in Pasadena, Calif., on Thursday. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

The CDC recommended that people with weakened immune systems get a third shot of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine. The move follows the FDA's authorization of such use a day earlier. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Family members gather outside the window of a COVID-19 patient at Lake Regional Hospital in Osage Beach, Mo., on Monday. Sarah Blake Morgan/AP hide caption

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Sarah Blake Morgan/AP

A CDC Document Gives New Details On Just How Dangerous The Delta Variant Really Is

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A teenager enters a pop-up COVID-19 vaccine site this month in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens in New York City. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Heins/Getty Images

The CDC has softened its guidance for how to operate summer camps for kids this year. Children 12 and older can get the COVID-19 vaccine. Here, a health care worker administers a vaccine dose to a teenager in Miami. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Tony Potts, a 69-year-old retiree living in Ormond Beach, Fla., receives his first injection earlier this year as a participant in a Phase 3 clinical trial of Moderna's COVID-19 candidate vaccine. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

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