Joe Neel Joe Neel is NPR's deputy senior supervising editor and a correspondent on the Science Desk.
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Joe Neel

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Joe Neel - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Joe Neel

NPR Deputy Senior Supervising Editor

Joe Neel is NPR's deputy senior supervising editor and a correspondent on the Science Desk.

As a leader of NPR's award-winning health and science team, Neel directs coverage of breaking news in health and science, ranging from disease outbreaks and advances in medical research to debates over health reform and public health.

Joe also plays a key role in overseeing the Science Desk's award-winning enterprise reporting. Among his current projects and responsibilities, Neel supervises the Monday "Your Health" segment on Morning Edition. He also directs several ongoing editorial partnerships. One, a partnership with Kaiser Health News and public radio member stations, focuses on health care in the United States. Another is a polling project on health issues with the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Neel has played a key role in expanding the network's coverage of global health and development issues. He is currently focused on domestic health issues, including cutting-edge biomedical research and developments in the health industry, such as the Affordable Care Act.

In 2008, he launched NPR's "Your Health" podcast and helped launch and grow "Shots," NPR's health blog, in 2010.

In addition to his responsibilities at NPR's Science Desk, Neel also regularly serves as newsroom manager, overseeing the network's overall news coverage.

During his tenure as editor, NPR's health reporters and correspondents have won numerous awards, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the National Academy of Sciences Communication Award, the Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society for Professional Journalists, the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting on Congress, the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Journalism Prize, and the Association of Health Care Journalism award. Neel was awarded the prestigious Kaiser Family Foundation Media Fellowship in 2007.

Neel started filing stories about medicine and health as a freelancer for NPR in 1994 and joined the staff two years later.

He earned bachelor degrees from Washington University in St. Louis in both biology and German literature and language. He also studied biology at the Universitaet Tuebingen in Germany.

Story Archive

Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine for young children is a lower-dose formulation of the companies' adult vaccine. It was found to be safe and nearly 91% effective at preventing COVID-19. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Ari Blank got a comforting hand-squeeze from his mom in May as he was vaccinated against COVID-19 in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. This week, the Food and Drug Administration authorized the use of Pfizer's vaccine in even younger kids — ages 5 to 11. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images
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NPR poll: The delta surge pushed Americans further behind in all walks of life

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A pupil wearing a face mask reads instructions for a coronavirus rapid test kit at the start of a lesson at an elementary school in Berlin on August 9, 2021. Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images

A health care worker fills a syringe with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City this year. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

A COVID-19 vaccine dose is prepared at a pharmacy in Baton Rouge, La., on Aug. 17. About 14 million people received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in August. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A nurse fills a syringe with Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic in Pasadena, Calif., on Thursday. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

The CDC recommended that people with weakened immune systems get a third shot of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine. The move follows the FDA's authorization of such use a day earlier. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Family members gather outside the window of a COVID-19 patient at Lake Regional Hospital in Osage Beach, Mo., on Monday. Sarah Blake Morgan/AP hide caption

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Sarah Blake Morgan/AP

A CDC Document Gives New Details On Just How Dangerous The Delta Variant Really Is

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A teenager enters a pop-up COVID-19 vaccine site this month in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens in New York City. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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The CDC has softened its guidance for how to operate summer camps for kids this year. Children 12 and older can get the COVID-19 vaccine. Here, a health care worker administers a vaccine dose to a teenager in Miami. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Tony Potts, a 69-year-old retiree living in Ormond Beach, Fla., receives his first injection earlier this year as a participant in a Phase 3 clinical trial of Moderna's COVID-19 candidate vaccine. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

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In Nashville, Tenn., a sign reminds visitors to wear masks at Belmont University, which is preparing to host Thursday's presidential debate. Federal health officials say a new study highlights the need for masks. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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