Lucian Kim Lucian Kim is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. He has been reporting on Europe and the former Soviet Union for the past two decades.
Lucian Kim at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by MJ Minutoli) (Square)
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Lucian Kim

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Lucian Kim at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by MJ Minutoli)
MJ Minutoli/NPR

Lucian Kim

International Correspondent, Moscow, Russia

Lucian Kim is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. He has been reporting on Europe and the former Soviet Union for the past two decades.

Before joining NPR in 2016, Kim was based in Berlin, where he was a regular contributor to Slate and Reuters. As one of the first foreign correspondents in Crimea when Russian troops arrived, Kim covered the 2014 Ukraine conflict for news organizations such as BuzzFeed and Newsweek.

Kim first moved to Moscow in 2003, becoming the business editor and a columnist for the Moscow Times. He later covered energy giant Gazprom and the Russian government for Bloomberg News.

Kim started his career in 1996 after receiving a Fulbright grant for young journalists in Berlin. There he worked as a correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor and the Boston Globe, reporting from central Europe, the Balkans, Afghanistan, and North Korea.

He has twice been the alternate for the Council on Foreign Relations' Edward R. Murrow Fellowship.

Kim was born and raised in Charleston, Illinois. He earned a bachelor's degree in geography and foreign languages from Clark University, studied journalism at the University of California at Berkeley, and graduated with a master's degree in nationalism studies from Central European University in Budapest.

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The Biden-Putin Summit Is Over. Both Sides Say It Was Positive

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"I Did What I Came To Do": President Biden Meets With Russia's Vladimir Putin

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What Biden And Putin's Meeting Could Mean For U.S.-Russia Relations

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People with old Belarusian national flags shout during an opposition rally in August in Minsk, Belarus. Sergei Grits/AP hide caption

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Sergei Grits/AP

5 Views From Belarus On The Country's Political Crisis

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In this 2011 photo, Joe Biden, then vice president, shakes hands with Vladimir Putin, then Russia's prime minister, in Moscow. President Biden will hold a summit with Putin this week in Geneva, a face-to-face meeting between the two leaders that comes amid escalating tensions between the U.S. and Russia. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Russia And U.S. Seek Stability At First Post-Trump Summit

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Protesters hold images of Belarus strongman Alexander Lukashenko, Belarus opposition activist Roman Protasevich and Protasevich's partner Sofia Sapega during a demonstration of Belarusians living in Poland and Poles supporting them in front of European Commission office in Warsaw on Monday. Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images

Why Belarus Went To Such Lengths To Arrest Journalist Roman Protasevich

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Ryanair Flight Carrying An Opposition Journalist Is Forced To Land In Belarus

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Belarus Intercepts Flight Carrying Opposition Activist

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Journalist Masha Borzunova during a taping of the show Fake News in TV Rain's Moscow studios. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Russian Show 'Fake News' Wages Lone Battle Against The Kremlin's TV Propaganda

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Relatives of students who attend a school in the Russian city of Kazan, where a gunman opened fire on Tuesday, killing several students and at least one teacher and injuring more than 20 others. Yegor Aleyev/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Yegor Aleyev/TASS via Getty Images

Despite Hundreds Of Daily COVID-19 Deaths In Russia, Moscow Streets Are Bustling

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