Lucian Kim Lucian Kim is an international correspondent based in Moscow, Russia.
Lucian Kim at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by MJ Minutoli) (Square)
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Lucian Kim

MJ Minutoli/NPR
Lucian Kim at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by MJ Minutoli)
MJ Minutoli/NPR

Lucian Kim

International Correspondent, Moscow, Russia

Lucian Kim is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. He has been reporting on Europe and the former Soviet Union for the past two decades.

Before joining NPR in 2016, Kim was based in Berlin, where he was a regular contributor to Slate and Reuters. As one of the first foreign correspondents in Crimea when Russian troops arrived, Kim covered the 2014 Ukraine conflict for news organizations such as BuzzFeed and Newsweek.

Kim first moved to Moscow in 2003, becoming the business editor and a columnist for the Moscow Times. He later covered energy giant Gazprom and the Russian government for Bloomberg News. When anti-government protests broke out in Moscow in 2011, he started a blog. In the following years he blogged about his travels to Chechnya and to Sochi, site of the 2014 Olympics.

Kim started his career in 1996 after receiving a Fulbright grant for young journalists in Berlin. There he worked as a correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor and the Boston Globe, reporting from central Europe, the Balkans, Afghanistan, and North Korea.

He has twice been the alternate for the Council on Foreign Relations Edward R. Murrow Fellowship.

Kim was born and raised in Charleston, Illinois. He earned a bachelor's degree in geography and foreign languages from Clark University, studied journalism at the University of California at Berkeley, and graduated with a master's degree in nationalism studies from Central European University in Budapest.

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Russian Police General Poised To Become Next President Of Interpol

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Russian Cheesemaker Benefits From Putin's Sanctions

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A woman places flowers at the Solovetsky Stone monument in front of the former KGB headquarters in central Moscow on Monday. Dozens of people gathered there to remember the victims of Soviet-era political repressions. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

More than a third of Riga's population is Russian; the rest are Latvian, Lithuanian, Belarusian, Polish and Ukrainian. Russian often serves as a linguistic common denominator in the Latvian capital. David Keyton/AP hide caption

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David Keyton/AP

A New Law In Latvia Aims To Preserve National Language By Limiting Russian In Schools

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Putin Warns Of Nuclear Arms Race

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'Solitary Picket' Is One Of The Last Forms Of Legal Public Protest In Russia

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President Ronald Reagan (right) and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev exchange pens during the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty signing ceremony in the White House on Dec. 8, 1987. Gorbachev's translator Pavel Palazhchenko stands in the middle. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Bob Daugherty/AP

The Great Synagogue in Vilnius, Lithuania's capital, was built in the 17th century. Vilnius served as a center of Jewish life in Eastern Europe before World War II. Collection of Zusya Efron, Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University of Jerusalem hide caption

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Collection of Zusya Efron, Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Excavation Of Lithuania's Great Synagogue Highlights A 'Painful Page' From History

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Ukraine Hopes Russia Takes Note Of Its Air Exercises With U.S.

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Latvia Pushes To Limit Russian Language In Effort To Strengthen National Identity

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The U.S. Consulate building in St. Petersburg, Russia, was closed earlier this year in tit-for-tat diplomatic penalties between the two countries. Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russia Blames Israel For Plane Shot Down By Syria

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Russians Protest Putin's Plan To Raise National Pension Age

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