Lucian Kim Lucian Kim is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. He has been reporting on Europe and the former Soviet Union for the past two decades.
Lucian Kim at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by MJ Minutoli) (Square)
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Lucian Kim

MJ Minutoli/NPR
Lucian Kim at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by MJ Minutoli)
MJ Minutoli/NPR

Lucian Kim

International Correspondent, Moscow, Russia

Lucian Kim is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. He has been reporting on Europe and the former Soviet Union for the past two decades.

Before joining NPR in 2016, Kim was based in Berlin, where he was a regular contributor to Slate and Reuters. As one of the first foreign correspondents in Crimea when Russian troops arrived, Kim covered the 2014 Ukraine conflict for news organizations such as BuzzFeed and Newsweek.

Kim first moved to Moscow in 2003, becoming the business editor and a columnist for the Moscow Times. He later covered energy giant Gazprom and the Russian government for Bloomberg News.

Kim started his career in 1996 after receiving a Fulbright grant for young journalists in Berlin. There he worked as a correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor and the Boston Globe, reporting from central Europe, the Balkans, Afghanistan, and North Korea.

He has twice been the alternate for the Council on Foreign Relations' Edward R. Murrow Fellowship.

Kim was born and raised in Charleston, Illinois. He earned a bachelor's degree in geography and foreign languages from Clark University, studied journalism at the University of California at Berkeley, and graduated with a master's degree in nationalism studies from Central European University in Budapest.

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Belarus' Longtime President Faces Unexpected Competition In Upcoming Election

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Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, presidential candidate in Belarus elections 2020, makes the symbol of victory in a rally in Minsk. Celestino Arce/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Protests Over The Arrest Of A Popular Governor Continue For 3rd Week In Russia

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People in the city of Khabarovsk hold posters with messages demanding freedom for Sergei Furgal, the former governor of Russia's Khabarovsk region, on July 18. Protesters have taken to the streets over Furgal's arrest this month on murder charges, which he denies. Igor Volkov/AP hide caption

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Igor Volkov/AP

Protesters In Russia's Far East Challenge Putin's Authority, Demand His Resignation

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Protests In Eastern Russian City Test Kremlin

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Sculptor Yevgeny Chubarov donated this installation of 282 stone heads in a cage — symbolizing Josef Stalin's countless victims — on the condition it be displayed next to the Soviet dictator. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP via Getty Images

What To Do With Toppled Statues? Russia Has A Fallen Monument Park

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Afghan Taliban militants and villagers celebrate a peace deal and victory in March. News reports allege Russia offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants to kill U.S. troops. Russia accuses U.S. intelligence of leaking the story to scuttle the peace process. Noorullah Shirzada/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noorullah Shirzada/AFP via Getty Images

Russia Denies Allegations It Paid Militants To Kill U.S. Troops As 'Nonsense'

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Russian President Vladimir Putin and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu shake hands at this month's Victory Day military parade marking the 75th anniversary of Nazi Germany's defeat in World War II. Alexei Nikolsky/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/TASS via Getty Images

Russians Are Voting On 206 Reforms. The Most Important One Will Extend Putin's Rule

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Postponed Because Of The Pandemic, Moscow Prepares To Mark Victory Day

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Verdict Is In For American In Russia Accused Of Spying

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Russia's Putin Declares State Of Emergency After Fuel Spill In Arctic

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People enjoy warm weather Monday in downtown Moscow. The mayor has announced the gradual lifting of the coronavirus lockdown in the Russian capital. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin, shown here earlier this month, declared a state of emergency on Wednesday in a region of Siberia after more than 20,000 tons of diesel fuel spilled from a power plant storage facility and fouled waterways. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

U.S. Election Interference Accusations Cause Kremlin Frustrations

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