James Doubek James Doubek is an associate editor and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast.
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James Doubek

Ghislaine Maxwell sits at the defense table during the final stages of jury selection on Monday in New York City in this courtroom sketch. Opening statements in her trial on sex-trafficking charges began Monday. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

Flowers and candles surround a photograph of Heather Heyer on the spot where she was killed and 19 others injured when a car slammed into a crowd of people protesting against a white supremacist rally in August 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump supporters clash with police and security forces during the insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Writer Anne Helen Petersen says that on the other side of the pandemic, there's a chance work will rotate more around people's lives instead of the other way around. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

As companies look to bring remote workers back to the office, a writer asks: Why?

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President Biden welcomed the Milwaukee Bucks to the White House, the first NBA champions to visit there in five years. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Columbia University professor John McWhorter argues that some anti-racism actions have gone too far. Penguin Random House hide caption

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Penguin Random House

'Woke Racism': John McWhorter argues against what he calls a religion of anti-racism

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Cargo containers sit in stacks at the Port of Los Angeles on Oct. 20 Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

A tech CEO got big attention for his plan to ease the backlog at Los Angeles ports

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For years, All in the Family was the most popular show on television. It debuted in 1971. Carroll O'Connor, left, played Archie Bunker. Jean Stapleton played his wife, Edith Bunker. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

'All in the Family' is 50 years old. A new book looks at how it changed TV

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Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo, pictured in June, is outlining her economic agenda. One goal is to increase U.S. semiconductor manufacturing. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo Calls For The U.S. To Counter China's Economic Power

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In his 30 years of sharing sex advice, Dan Savage has seen changes in how his audience communicates, what they ask and how opinions — even his — evolve. Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Tiffany & Co. hide caption

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Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Tiffany & Co.

Dan Savage Looks At What Has Changed In The 30 Years He's Been Giving Sex Advice

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School administrators and police are warning parents about a trend in which students destroy objects in school bathrooms for attention on social media. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

People leave to board a flight at the airport in Kabul on Monday. Leaving Afghanistan for the U.S. has become a huge challenge now that American troops and embassy staff have left the country. Karim Sahim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karim Sahim/AFP via Getty Images

Afghans Trying To Get To The U.S. Face A Daunting Visa-Approval Process

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