James Doubek James Doubek is an associate editor and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast.
Stories By

James Doubek

James Doubek

Associate Editor, Digital News Desk

James Doubek is an associate editor and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast. In 2018, he reported feature stories for NPR's business desk on topics including electric scooters, cryptocurrency, and small business owners who lost out when Amazon made a deal with Apple.

In the fall of that year, Doubek was selected for NPR's internal enrichment rotation to work as an audio producer for Weekend Edition. He spent two months pitching, producing, and editing interviews and pieces for broadcast.

As an associate producer for NPR's digital content team, Doubek edits online stories and manages NPR's website and social media presence.

He got his start at NPR as an intern at the Washington Desk, where he made frequent trips to the Supreme Court and reported on political campaigns.

Story Archive

A female Lymantria dispar moth lays her eggs on the trunk of a tree in Connecticut in 2008. In July 2021, the Entomological Society of America announced it was dropping the common name of this destructive insect that is also an slur against a group of people: the gypsy moth. Bob Child/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bob Child/AP

Crews are preparing to demolish the rest of the condo building that partially collapsed in Surfside, Fla., as a storm approaches. Michael Reaves/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Reaves/Getty Images

In this June 29, 2018, file photo, pictures of five employees of the Capital Gazette newspaper adorn candles during a vigil across the street from where they were slain in the newsroom in Annapolis, Md. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

The 'Capital Gazette' Gunman's Trial Began Today. Here's What You Need To Know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1011222211/1011472546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People visit a makeshift memorial for the victims of the building collapse, near the site of the accident in Surfside, Fla., on Sunday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Lulu Merle Johnson, a professor and historian, was the first Black woman to earn a Ph.D. in Iowa. Johnson County, Iowa, is naming itself after her. John I. Jackson hide caption

toggle caption
John I. Jackson

Johnson County, Iowa, Renames Itself After A Different Johnson

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1010462751/1010469270" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Members of the South Florida Urban Search and Rescue team look for possible survivors in the partially collapsed 12-story Champlain Towers South condo building on Saturday. Rescuers found an additional body Saturday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Moises Monterrubio walks a highline 1,600 feet in the air at Yosemite National Park in June. The line stretched 2,800 feet, setting a record in Yosemite and in California, according to the International Slackline Association. Ryan Sheridan/Moises Monterrubio hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Sheridan/Moises Monterrubio

Stunning Photos Capture 2 Brothers' Walk 1,600 Feet Above Yosemite

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1009104849/1009129048" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Australotitan cooperensis is the new species confirmed by paleontologists in Australia. It's the biggest dinosaur discovered in Australia. Vlad Konstantinov and Scott Hocknull/Eromanga Natural History Museum hide caption

toggle caption
Vlad Konstantinov and Scott Hocknull/Eromanga Natural History Museum

A man walks past sacks containing debris washed ashore from the X-Press Pearl on a beach in Colombo on Thursday. The plastic pellets will break down and be more difficult to clean up over time, marine biologist Asha de Vos says. Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP via Getty Images

The Ship Sinking Off Sri Lanka Looks Like A Lasting Environmental Disaster

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1003445739/1003468954" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Security camera footage tweeted by New York State Assembly Member Yuh-Line Niou shows a man attacking a woman of Asian descent on a New York City sidewalk. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Screenshot by NPR