James Doubek James Doubek is an associate editor and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast.
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James Doubek

James Doubek

Associate Editor, Digital News Desk

James Doubek is an associate editor and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast. In 2018, he reported feature stories for NPR's business desk on topics including electric scooters, cryptocurrency, and small business owners who lost out when Amazon made a deal with Apple.

In the fall of that year, Doubek was selected for NPR's internal enrichment rotation to work as an audio producer for Weekend Edition. He spent two months pitching, producing, and editing interviews and pieces for broadcast.

As an associate producer for NPR's digital content team, Doubek edits online stories and manages NPR's website and social media presence.

He got his start at NPR as an intern at the Washington Desk, where he made frequent trips to the Supreme Court and reported on political campaigns.

Story Archive

Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo, pictured in June, is outlining her economic agenda. One goal is to increase U.S. semiconductor manufacturing. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo Calls For The U.S. To Counter China's Economic Power

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In his 30 years of sharing sex advice, Dan Savage has seen changes in how his audience communicates, what they ask and how opinions — even his — evolve. Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Tiffany & Co. hide caption

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Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Tiffany & Co.

Dan Savage Looks At What Has Changed In The 30 Years He's Been Giving Sex Advice

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School administrators and police are warning parents about a trend in which students destroy objects in school bathrooms for attention on social media. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

People leave to board a flight at the airport in Kabul on Monday. Leaving Afghanistan for the U.S. has become a huge challenge now that American troops and embassy staff have left the country. Karim Sahim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karim Sahim/AFP via Getty Images

Afghans Trying To Get To The U.S. Face A Daunting Visa-Approval Process

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A carry team moves a transfer case containing the remains of Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Jared M. Schmitz during a casualty return on Sunday at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Father Of Marine Killed In Kabul Reflects On His Son's Life And Saying 'I Love You'

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The two NASA spacesuit prototypes, one for exploring the surface of the moon's South Pole (left) and one for launch and reentry aboard the agency's Orion spacecraft, won't become a reality in time for a planned 2024 mission. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

An Afghan interpreter with the U.S. Army is pictured in 2010. Many interpreters now fear for their lives with the Taliban taking power. Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images

An Afghan Interpreter Who Helped The U.S. Military Is Now A Target For The Taliban

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The ICU Covid-19 ward at NEA Baptist Memorial Hospital in Jonesboro, Ark., last week. Maranie R. Staab/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Maranie R. Staab/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko dismisses international criticism at a news conference Monday in Minsk. The U.S. and other countries announced new sanctions against Belarusian officials and Lukashenko's allies. Pavel Orlovsky/Belta/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pavel Orlovsky/Belta/AFP via Getty Images

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, here in July, has announced a move to require COVID-19 vaccines for all service members. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images