James Doubek James Doubek is an associate producer and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast.
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James Doubek

James Doubek

Associate Producer, Digital News Desk

James Doubek is an associate producer and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast. In 2018, he reported feature stories for NPR's business desk on topics including electric scooters, cryptocurrency, and small business owners who lost out when Amazon made a deal with Apple.

In the fall of that year, Doubek was selected for NPR's internal enrichment rotation to work as an audio producer for Weekend Edition. He spent two months pitching, producing, and editing interviews and pieces for broadcast.

As an associate producer for NPR's digital content team, Doubek edits online stories and manages NPR's website and social media presence.

He got his start at NPR as an intern at the Washington Desk, where he made frequent trips to the Supreme Court and reported on political campaigns.

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Story Archive

A woman walks past a boarded up store in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday. Professor Jody David Armour says protesters today are more diverse and have more empathy than in 1992. Agustin Paullier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Agustin Paullier/AFP via Getty Images

USC Professor On How Protests Have Changed Since LA Riots In 1992

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Montgomery's Capri Theatre, seen on March 22, was closed because of the coronavirus. Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed says the city health system's capacity to manage the crisis has hit unsustainable levels. Taylor Hill/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., attends a press conference on Feb. 26 on Capitol Hill. Omar tells NPR the progressive left "has moved the needle on the national conversation" surrounding certain policies. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Ilhan Omar On Her Memoir And Moving The Needle Toward Progressive Policies

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People wait in line to get food distributed by the National Guard in Chelsea, Mass., on April 16. Harvard researchers found areas with more poverty, people of color and crowded housing had higher mortality rates for the coronavirus. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Harvard Researchers Find 'Inequality On Top Of Inequality' In COVID-19 Deaths

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Dozens have died of COVID-19 at the Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center in Brighton Township, Pa., pictured on May 12. Pennsylvania's health secretary defended the state's plan to test every resident and staffer at every nursing home. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Store manager Josh Hayden, left to right, talks with Kay Amey and Jackie Gee about a new bicycle at Eddy's Bike Shop on Tuesday in Willoughby Hills, Ohio. Bike shops in most states were exempt from shutdown orders and sales have been up. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Tony Dejak/AP

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo briefs the media during a coronavirus news conference at his office in New York City on May 9. On Saturday, he said horse and auto racing could resume June 1. John Roca/New York Post via AP hide caption

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John Roca/New York Post via AP

Health care workers place a nasal swab from a patient into a tube for testing at the Brightpoint Health and UJA-Federation of New York pop-up coronavirus testing site on Friday in New York City. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on May 7. Cassidy says testing needs to be targeted. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

French Education Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer (left) and French President Emmanuel Macron participate in a video conference with mayors and directors of schools at the Pierre Ronsard elementary school in Poissy, west of Paris, on Tuesday. Ian Langsdon/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Langsdon/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Emerson Weber, a 5th grader in South Dakota, is an avid letter writer whose thank-you note to her mail carrier went viral. Hugh Weber hide caption

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Hugh Weber

An 11-Year-Old Girl Writes To Thank Her Mailman. Postal Workers Write Back

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