Maggie Penman
Maggie Penman
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Maggie Penman

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Modern psychology shows that we all have a little bit of Narcissus in us. Most of us like people who remind us of ourselves — whether that is someone else with the same name or the same birthday. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR

The myth that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

Facts Aren't Enough: The Psychology Of False Beliefs

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Researcher Elizabeth Currid-Halkett says celebrity can be boiled down to a simple formula. Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage
Nick Shepherd/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Creative Differences: The Benefits Of Reaching Out To People Unlike Ourselves

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Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Playing The Gender Card: Overlooking And Overthrowing Sexist Stereotypes

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A young Maya Shankar. Courtesy of Maya Shankar hide caption

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Courtesy of Maya Shankar

A young Maya Shankar. Courtesy of Maya Shankar hide caption

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Courtesy of Maya Shankar

Fresh Starts: Tales Of Renewal For A New Year

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"Compassion is contagious," Professor Scott Plous says. "We talk about paying it forward; the idea that if you do something good for another person [...] it sets off a kind of chain reaction." Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Alan Alda Jhon Ochoa, Photo-illustration: Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Jhon Ochoa, Photo-illustration: Renee Klahr/NPR
Andrea Cappelli/Picture Press/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Too Little, Too Much: How Poverty and Wealth Affect Our Minds

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Jana Mestecky (left) poses for a cast photo during production of the play Des rats et des hommes, directed by Israel Horovitz (front, third from left). The photo appeared in the French magazine, L'Avant-Scène, Courtesy of Jana Mestecky hide caption

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Courtesy of Jana Mestecky

Fires And Explosions Reported In Massachusetts Towns

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Even Thomas Edison got it wrong sometimes. In 1890, he marketed this creepy talking doll that was taken off the shelves after just a few weeks. Listen to its horrifying rendition of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star." Collection of Robin and Joan Rolfs/Courtesy of Thomas Edison National Historical Park hide caption

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Collection of Robin and Joan Rolfs/Courtesy of Thomas Edison National Historical Park