Ryan Kellman Ryan Kellman is a producer and visual reporter for NPR's science desk.
Ryan Kellman 2017
Stories By

Ryan Kellman

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Ryan Kellman 2017
Colin Marshall/NPR

Ryan Kellman

Producer, Science Desk

Ryan Kellman is a producer and visual reporter for NPR's science desk. Kellman joined the desk in 2014. In his first months on the job, he worked on NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa. He has won several other notable awards for his work: He is a Fulbright Grant recipient, he has received a John Collier Award in Documentary Photography, and he has several first place wins in the WHNPA's Eyes of History Awards. He holds a master's degree from Ohio University's School of Visual Communication and a B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute.

From 2015-2018, Kellman produced NPR's science YouTube show — Skunk Bear — for which he covered a wide range of science subjects, from the brain science of break-ups to the lives of snowy owls. Currently, Kellman's work focuses on climate, energy, health, and space.

Story Archive

Families gather in a playground with a splash pad and swings in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. Philadelphia has multiple projects underway to make this and other large parks in the city more resilient to heat and other effects of climate change. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

City parks can be wild and remote, even if they're in the backyard. Here, early morning hikers rest before walking down Piestewa Peak, one of many mountainous city parks in Phoenix. "There's, like, a 5 million-person city right there. And then you turn out here, and you could be in the high desert," says Claire Miller, a longtime park supervisor in Phoenix. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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A nurse administers a shot to a patient. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Fighting to survive: Ukraine's cancer patients' struggle to find care while fleeing

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Oleh Pokrovsky helps man a small checkpoint on a bumpy road leading to his village. "The privilege that we have of sitting here at this checkpoint is thanks directly to those who are enlisted in the military and are defending Ukraine's borders," he says. "If it weren't for them, then this would be under Russian occupation right now." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Far from the front lines, Ukrainians guard checkpoints and wait for the war to come

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As people pour off the trains arriving in Lviv, signs offer guidance on transportation, shelter and other aid. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Lviv takes in displaced Ukrainians but space and resources are strained

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A volunteer at the hotel sorts donated clothing. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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A Polish hotel recovering from its own tragic past has become a refuge for Ukrainians

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Two Ukrainian girls in foster care look out the window of a home they are now sharing with a Polish foster family in Bilgoraj, Poland. More than 1.5 million Ukrainians — many of them children — have fled since the Russian invasion. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A mountain lion photographed with a motion sensor camera in the Verdugo Mountains overlooking the city lights of Los Angeles. New money for wildlife crossings will help animals whose habitat has been cut by roadways. National Park Service hide caption

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National Park Service

A seawall stretches for hundreds of miles along the coast of Guyana, in northern South America. It protects the low-lying coastal lands where the majority of Guyana's population lives. The region is acutely threatened by rising sea levels, as well as other symptoms of climate change, yet Guyana is embracing the oil industry. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Guyana is a poor country that was a green champion. Then Exxon discovered oil

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Timothy Dominique, 62, lives in a donated RV parked next door to the family home where he was staying when Hurricane Laura hit Lake Charles last year. He says he received nothing from FEMA because he does not own the home and didn't have a formal rental agreement. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Why FEMA Aid Is Unavailable To Many Who Need It The Most

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Cleveland's Tree Coalition has set an ambitious goal. It wants to plant hundreds of thousands of trees over the next two decades. So far, though, the city's tree canopy is still shrinking. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Bringing Back Trees To 'Forest City's' Redlined Areas Helps Residents And The Climate

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Agnes Boisvert, an ICU nurse at St. Luke's hospital in downtown Boise, Idaho, spends every day trying to navigate between two worlds. One is a swirl of beeping monitors, masked emotion and death; the other, she says, seems oblivious to the horrors occurring every hour of every day. Isabel Seliger for NPR hide caption

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Isabel Seliger for NPR