Ryan Kellman Ryan Kellman is a producer and visual reporter for NPR's science desk.
Stories By

Ryan Kellman

Colin Marshall/NPR
Ryan Kellman 2017
Colin Marshall/NPR

Ryan Kellman

Producer, Science Desk

Ryan Kellman is a producer and visual reporter for NPR's science desk. Kellman joined the desk in 2014. In his first months on the job, he worked on NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa. He has won several other notable awards for his work: He is a Fulbright Grant recipient, he has received a John Collier Award in Documentary Photography, and he has several first place wins in the WHNPA's Eyes of History Awards. He holds a master's degree from Ohio University's School of Visual Communication and a B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute.

From 2015-2018, Kellman produced NPR's science YouTube show — Skunk Bear — for which he covered a wide range of science subjects, from the brain science of break-ups to the lives of snowy owls. Currently, Kellman's work focuses on climate, energy, health, and space.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

A truck sits in still water after Hurricane Laura swept through Cameron Parish, La. The hurricane inflicted at least $8 billion in damage to southwest Louisiana when it hit in late August. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

The annual town meeting in North Andover, Mass., which dates back to 1646, was held outside on June 16 on a high school football field to help keep participants a safe distance from each other. Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In Manhattan, Isiah Turner isn't particularly worried about the outbreak. Other than continuously washing his hands and cleaning, he says, "it's just another day." (Right) Ali Sky isn't worried about her own health but says, "I'm really worried about my husband." Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elias Williams for NPR

Ron Peters gives a tour of the rivers and waterways that run through Ellicott City. Peters installed security cameras around Ellicott City after the 2016 flood to learn more about how flooding in Ellicott City happens. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

Flames creep along the cedar siding on a test house hit by blown embers at a research facility run by the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

Step 1: Build A House. Step 2: Set It On Fire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/704854496/709574131" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Skunk Bear/Skunk Bear

Classroom Skeleton: Whose Bones Are These?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/594907805/596529900" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript