Michel Martin Michel Martin is weekend host of All Things Considered and host of the Consider This Saturday podcast
Stories By

Michel Martin

Steve Voss/NPR
Michel Martin - 2014
Steve Voss/NPR

Michel Martin

Weekend Host, All Things Considered and Consider This

Michel Martin is the weekend host of All Things Considered and host of the Consider This Saturday podcast, where she draws on her deep reporting and interviewing experience to dig in to the week's news. Outside the studio, she has also hosted "Michel Martin: Going There," an ambitious live event series in collaboration with Member Stations.

Martin came to NPR in 2006 and launched Tell Me More, a one-hour daily NPR news and talk show that aired on NPR stations nationwide from 2007-2014 and dipped into thousands of important conversations taking place in the corridors of power, but also in houses of worship, and barber shops and beauty shops, at PTA meetings, town halls, and at the kitchen table.

She has spent more than 25 years as a journalist — first in print with major newspapers and then in television. Tell Me More marked her debut as a full-time public radio show host. Martin says, "What makes public radio special is that it's got both intimacy and reach all at once. For the cost of a phone call, I can take you around the world. But I'm right there with you in your car, in your living room or kitchen or office, in your iPod. Radio itself is an incredible tool and when you combine that with the global resources of NPR plus the commitment to quality, responsibility and civility, it's an unbeatable combination."

Martin has also served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines and talk shows, including Talk of the Nation and News & Notes.

Martin joined NPR from ABC News, where she worked since 1992. She served as correspondent for Nightline from 1996 to 2006, reporting on such subjects as the congressional budget battles, the U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, racial profiling and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. At ABC, she also contributed to numerous programs and specials, including the network's award-winning coverage of Sept. 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy, a critically acclaimed AIDS special and reports for the ongoing series "America in Black and White." Martin reported for the ABC newsmagazine Day One, winning an Emmy for her coverage of the international campaign to ban the use of landmines, and was a regular panelist on This Week with George Stephanopoulos. She also hosted the 13-episode series Life 360, an innovative program partnership between Oregon Public Broadcasting and Nightline incorporating documentary film, performance and personal narrative; it aired on public television stations across the country.

Before joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Martin has been honored by numerous organizations, including the Candace Award for Communications from The National Coalition of 100 Black Women, the Joan Barone Award for Excellence in Washington-based National Affairs/Public Policy Broadcasting from the Radio and Television Correspondents' Association and a 2002 Silver Gavel Award, given by the American Bar Association. Along with her Emmy award, she received three additional Emmy nominations, including one with WNYC's Robert Krulwich, at the time an ABC contributor as well, for an ABC News program examining children's racial attitudes. In 2019, Martin was elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for outstanding achievement in journalism. She is the 2021 recipient of PMJA's 2021 Leo C. Lee Award.

A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Martin graduated cum laude from Radcliffe College at Harvard University in 1980 and earned a Master of Arts from the Wesley Theological Seminary in 2016.

Story Archive

Liev Schreiber co-founded the aid network BlueCheck Ukraine. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Liev Schreiber's family ties to Ukraine push him to help its people

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100564550/1100614953" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland will speak with survivors of Native American boarding schools as part of a tour called "The Road to Healing." Her department found that between 1819 and 1969, the federal government operated or supported more than 400 schools. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Haaland seeks healing for Native American boarding school survivors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100554017/1100614947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I have been the architect of my creativity and my life in such a specific and obsessive way," Florence Welch tells NPR. Autumn de Wilde hide caption

toggle caption
Autumn de Wilde

On 'Dance Fever,' Florence + the Machine explores her fractured desires

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099021095/1099029015" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Coldplay James Marcus Haney hide caption

toggle caption
James Marcus Haney

Back from a touring hiatus, Coldplay pledges to make performances more sustainable

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098947216/1098969492" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sign telling consumers of limits on the purchase of baby formula hangs on the edge of an empty shelf for the product in a King Soopers grocery store, Wednesday, in Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Zalubowski/AP

Senator says Biden should consider Defense Production Act to boost baby formula supply

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098564711/1098969486" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mark Esper has written a book about the challenges he faced as Defense secretary in the Trump administration. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Former Pentagon chief Esper says Trump asked about shooting protesters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097517470/1097673897" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anastasiia Konovalova of Odesa, Ukraine, teaches an English class to young Ukrainian refugee children at a high school called Mihai Viteazul National College in Bucharest on April 6. Ioana Moldovan for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ioana Moldovan for NPR

A teacher set up a school for Ukrainian refugee children in Romania

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091951564/1091951565" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

US Ambassador to the UN, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, visits Gara de Nord railway station where infrastructure has been put in place to welcome and assist refugees coming from Ukraine, in Bucharest, Romania, on April 4th, 2022 Ioana Moldovan for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ioana Moldovan for NPR

U.S. ambassador to the U.N. calls for suspending Russia from the Human Rights Council

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1090919925/1090919926" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript