Michel Martin Michel Martin is weekend host of All Things Considered.
Stories By

Michel Martin

Steve Voss/NPR
Michel Martin - 2014
Steve Voss/NPR

Michel Martin

Weekend Host, All Things Considered

Michel Martin is the weekend host of All Things Considered, where she draws on her deep reporting and interviewing experience to dig in to the week's news. Outside the studio, she has also hosted "Michel Martin: Going There," an ambitious live event series in collaboration with Member Stations.

Martin came to NPR in 2006 and launched Tell Me More, a one-hour daily NPR news and talk show that aired on NPR stations nationwide from 2007-2014 and dipped into thousands of important conversations taking place in the corridors of power, but also in houses of worship, and barber shops and beauty shops, at PTA meetings, town halls, and at the kitchen table.

She has spent more than 25 years as a journalist — first in print with major newspapers and then in television. Tell Me More marked her debut as a full-time public radio show host. Martin says, "What makes public radio special is that it's got both intimacy and reach all at once. For the cost of a phone call, I can take you around the world. But I'm right there with you in your car, in your living room or kitchen or office, in your iPod. Radio itself is an incredible tool and when you combine that with the global resources of NPR plus the commitment to quality, responsibility and civility, it's an unbeatable combination."

Martin has also served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines and talk shows, including Talk of the Nation and News & Notes.

Martin joined NPR from ABC News, where she worked since 1992. She served as correspondent for Nightline from 1996 to 2006, reporting on such subjects as the congressional budget battles, the U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, racial profiling and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. At ABC, she also contributed to numerous programs and specials, including the network's award-winning coverage of Sept. 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy, a critically acclaimed AIDS special and reports for the ongoing series "America in Black and White." Martin reported for the ABC newsmagazine Day One, winning an Emmy for her coverage of the international campaign to ban the use of landmines, and was a regular panelist on This Week with George Stephanopoulos. She also hosted the 13-episode series Life 360, an innovative program partnership between Oregon Public Broadcasting and Nightline incorporating documentary film, performance and personal narrative; it aired on public television stations across the country.

Before joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Martin has been honored by numerous organizations, including the Candace Award for Communications from The National Coalition of 100 Black Women, the Joan Barone Award for Excellence in Washington-based National Affairs/Public Policy Broadcasting from the Radio and Television Correspondents' Association and a 2002 Silver Gavel Award, given by the American Bar Association. Along with her Emmy award, she received three additional Emmy nominations, including one with WNYC's Robert Krulwich, at the time an ABC contributor as well, for an ABC News program examining children's racial attitudes. In 2019, Martin was elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for outstanding achievement in journalism.

A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Martin graduated cum laude from Radcliffe College at Harvard University in 1980 and earned a Master of Arts from the Wesley Theological Seminary in 2016.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

From Louboutins to Manolo Blahniks, high heels have had their place in both pop culture and high fashion, but author Lauren Bravo says that the days of high heels could be numbered. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

Falling Flat: Are The Days Of High Heels Coming To An End?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758840787/758858701" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When ESPN The Magazine set out to create its Body Issue, the idea was to celebrate how varied athletic bodies really are. The last print edition of the annual issue, which is also the last print edition of the magazine, is being released this week. Marcus Eriksson for ESPN hide caption

toggle caption
Marcus Eriksson for ESPN

ESPN Celebrates Variation Of Athletic Bodies In Final Print Edition Of Its Magazine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758791075/758791340" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

"I just feel like that kind of just followed me all throughout my life. I've always kind of been slept on a bit," Ari Lennox says. Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR

Ari Lennox Has Always Felt Slept On. That's What Motivates Her.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753759126/754199534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The new animated short Hair Love follows the story of an African American father trying to do his daughter's hair. Courtesy of Sony Pictures Animation hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Sony Pictures Animation

'Hair Love' Uses Animation To Bring A Story Of Natural Hair In Black Families To Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/754160144/754175807" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Particular Kind Of Black Man cover image Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR

Tope Folarin Was 'A Particular Kind Of Black Man' — So He Wrote A Book About It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/751917486/754052349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(From left) Nick, Joe and Kevin Jonas attend the premiere of the Jonas Brothers documentary, Amazon Prime Video's Chasing Happiness, in June 2019 in Los Angeles. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

The Jonas Brothers Recapture The 'Magic Missing' By Putting Family First

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/751756947/752075468" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Officials Respond To Shooting In El Paso

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747909513/747909514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Fairview, a respectable African American family prepares for a big dinner. But we slowly learn there's something off about Keisha (MaYaa Boateng) and her relatives. Julieta Cervantes/Soho Rep hide caption

toggle caption
Julieta Cervantes/Soho Rep

The Pulitzer-Winning Play 'Fairview' Is About Being Watched While Black

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/739057321/741644718" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jessica Bray and her husband, Anthony Bray, pose with their 1970 Volkswagen Beetle. Anthony converted his Beetle to an electric car. "As a special touch, we added bubble machines to the back to blow bubbles at car shows and as we drive," Jessica said. Courtesy of Jessica Bray hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jessica Bray

A Bug's Life: Remembering The Classic Volkswagen Beetle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741256557/741485118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In The Farewell, Billi (Awkwafina, left) returns to China to spend time with her grandmother — who doesn't know she is dying thanks to an elaborate ruse. A24 hide caption

toggle caption
A24

In 'The Farewell,' The Bad News Bearers Keep A Secret

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741217856/741485130" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police patrol outside Columbine High School in April in Littleton, Colo., when all Denver-area schools were evacuated after authorities launched a manhunt for Sol Pais, a Columbine-obsessed teen who they feared posed a threat. Chet Strange/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chet Strange/AFP/Getty Images

Superintendent Calls For 'Thoughtful' Discussion Over Proposal To Demolish Columbine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/739357969/739357972" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript