Michel Martin Michel Martin is weekend host of All Things Considered.
Stories By

Michel Martin

Steve Voss/NPR
Michel Martin - 2014
Steve Voss/NPR

Michel Martin

Weekend Host, All Things Considered

Michel Martin is the weekend host of All Things Considered, where she draws on her deep reporting and interviewing experience to dig in to the week's news. Outside the studio, she has also hosted "Michel Martin: Going There," an ambitious live event series in collaboration with Member Stations.

Martin came to NPR in 2006 and launched Tell Me More, a one-hour daily NPR news and talk show that aired on NPR stations nationwide from 2007-2014 and dipped into thousands of important conversations taking place in the corridors of power, but also in houses of worship, and barber shops and beauty shops, at PTA meetings, town halls, and at the kitchen table.

She has spent more than 25 years as a journalist — first in print with major newspapers and then in television. Tell Me More marked her debut as a full-time public radio show host. Martin says, "What makes public radio special is that it's got both intimacy and reach all at once. For the cost of a phone call, I can take you around the world. But I'm right there with you in your car, in your living room or kitchen or office, in your iPod. Radio itself is an incredible tool and when you combine that with the global resources of NPR plus the commitment to quality, responsibility and civility, it's an unbeatable combination."

Martin has also served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines and talk shows, including Talk of the Nation and News & Notes.

Martin joined NPR from ABC News, where she worked since 1992. She served as correspondent for Nightline from 1996 to 2006, reporting on such subjects as the congressional budget battles, the U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, racial profiling and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. At ABC, she also contributed to numerous programs and specials, including the network's award-winning coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy, a critically acclaimed AIDS special and reports for the ongoing series "America in Black and White." Martin reported for the ABC newsmagazine Day One, winning an Emmy for her coverage of the international campaign to ban the use of landmines, and was a regular panelist on This Week with George Stephanopoulos. She also hosted the 13-episode series Life 360, an innovative program partnership between Oregon Public Broadcasting and Nightline incorporating documentary film, performance and personal narrative; it aired on public television stations across the country.

Before joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Martin has been honored by numerous organizations, including the Candace Award for Communications from The National Coalition of 100 Black Women, the Joan Barone Award for Excellence in Washington-based National Affairs/Public Policy Broadcasting from the Radio and Television Correspondents' Association and a 2002 Silver Gavel Award, given by the American Bar Association. Along with her Emmy award, she received three additional Emmy nominations, including one with WNYC's Robert Krulwich, at the time an ABC contributor as well, for an ABC News program examining children's racial attitudes.

A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Martin graduated cum laude from Radcliffe College at Harvard University in 1980 and earned a Master of Arts from the Wesley Theological Seminary in 2016.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Lazarus Act 2. Choreographer: Rennie Harris, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Paul Kolnik hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Kolnik

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Debuts 'Lazarus' To Celebrate 60th Anniversary

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695552120/695593584" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Annie Merner Pfeiffer Chapel is seen on the campus of Bennett College in Greensboro, N.C. The college, one of two historically black colleges for women, is fighting to maintain its accreditation. Bennett College hide caption

toggle caption
Bennett College

Facing Loss Of Accreditation Over Finances, Women's HBCU Raises Millions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695593570/695593571" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 2011, Emma Hutchinson School was one of the Atlanta Public Schools identified by a state government report as part of a widespread cheating scandal. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Bazemore/AP

Former Teacher Blames Education Policymakers For Atlanta Cheating Scandal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695344751/695488120" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Noted for its sharp commentary on race, identity, sex and politics, Noname's album, Room 25, was one of the most critically-acclaimed records of last year. Chantal Anderson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Chantal Anderson/Courtesy of the artist

'We Need To Exist In Multitudes': Noname Talks Artistic Independence, Women In Rap

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692701998/693226648" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A photo on the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity yearbook page from 1972 shows someone wearing blackface for a costume. Courtesy of Abby Clukey hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Abby Clukey

U.Va. Students Investigate Their Yearbook's Racist History — Starting With Its Title

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/693226601/693226602" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"You can't tell me that a movie that I'm doing about a story that involves black culture is not going to reach other corners of the world," Taraji P. Henson says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

'What Men Want' Actor Taraji P. Henson Talks Fighting 'Like A Girl'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692686103/693062517" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Journalist Jill Abramson participates in a conference at Santa Clara Convention Center on Feb. 24, 2015 in Santa Clara, Calif. Marla Aufmuth/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marla Aufmuth/Getty Images

Transcript: Former 'New York Times' Editor Jill Abramson Addresses Book Allegations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692368495/693069276" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mo Better Jaguars' coaches and players huddle at the end of practice at Betsy Head Park in Brownsville, Brooklyn in September 2014. Courtesy of Albert Samaha hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Albert Samaha

Poor Students More Likely To Play Football, Despite Brain Injury Concerns

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691081227/691131614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Comedian Amanda Seales attends HBO's "I Be Knowin'" screening at The Roxy Hotel Cinema on Jan. 23, 2019 in New York City. Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for HBO hide caption

toggle caption
Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for HBO

'Insecure' Star Amanda Seales Takes The Stand-Up Stage In HBO's 'I Be Knowin"

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689063677/689063678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

American civil rights activist Bayard Rustin, pictured in 1964, as spokesman for the Citywide Committee for Integration, at the organization's headquarters, Silcam Presbyterian Church in New York City. Patrick A. Burns/New York Times Co./Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick A. Burns/New York Times Co./Getty Images

In Newly Found Audio, A Forgotten Civil Rights Leader Says Coming Out 'Was An Absolute Necessity'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682598649/682715013" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ocean Cleanup's System 001 was towed out of the San Francisco Bay on Sept. 8, 2018. JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images

An Engineering Wunderkind's Ocean Plastics Cleanup Device Hits A Setback

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682532583/682570705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jackie Hoffman (right) plays Yente the matchmaker in the Yiddish adaptation of Fiddler. Hoffman grew up hearing her mother and grandmother speak Yiddish and for years has been teaching little phrases to fellow cast members. "I've got gentiles speaking Yiddish all over this town now," she says. Victor Nechay/ProperPix hide caption

toggle caption
Victor Nechay/ProperPix

This Yente Found The Perfect Match, Performing 'Fiddler' In Yiddish

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/679217366/679724756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers studied the carbon storage of deep-water seagrasses living at Lizard Island, Australia. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Deep Seagrass Bed Could Stall Climate Change, If Climate Change Doesn't Kill It First

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676913451/677252502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Regina King stars as Sharon, the mother of embattled young lover Tish, If Beale Street Could Talk. Tatum Mangus/Annapurna Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Tatum Mangus/Annapurna Pictures

'Black Love In All Its Different Ways': Regina King On Her 'Beale Street' Role

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676951660/677100922" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anthony Schmidt, associate curator of Bible and Religion in America at the museum, says the first instance of the abridged version of the Bible titled, Parts of the Holy Bible, selected for the use of the Negro Slaves, in the British West-India Islands, was published in 1807. Museum of the Bible hide caption

toggle caption
Museum of the Bible

Slave Bible From The 1800s Omitted Key Passages That Could Incite Rebellion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/674995075/675139578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript