Madeline K. Sofia Madeline Sofia is the host of Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast.
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Madeline K. Sofia

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Maddie
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Madeline K. Sofia

Host, Science Desk

Madeline Sofia is the host of Short Wave — NPR's daily science podcast. Short Wave will bring a little science into your life, all in about 10 minutes. Sometimes it'll be a good story, a smart conversation, or a fun explainer, but it'll always be interesting and easy to understand. It's a break from the relentless news cycle, but you'll still come away with a better understanding of the world around you.

Before hosting Short Wave, Sofia hosted the NPR video show "Maddie About Science." The show takes viewers behind the scenes with scientists, revealing their motivations and sharing their research — from insect mimics to space probes headed for the sun. Sofia also co-developed the worldwide NPR Scicommers program, which supports scientists interested in building their communication skills.

Before working at NPR, Sofia received her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of Rochester Medical Center. She studied Vibrio cholerae, a fascinating bacterium that has haunted the human race.

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Jon Jacobo, the Latino Task Force for COVID-19, and UCSF members during UCSF's mass testing study at Garfield Square. A study of the virus's spread held by UC San Francisco researchers in partnership with San Francisco Department of Public Health and Zuckerberg General, mass testing is provided free of charge for the residents and workers in a one mile square radius of the Mission district. Mike Kai Chen hide caption

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Mike Kai Chen

Handwashing 101: A Guide To Proper Washing (And Drying)

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Sampson wears personal protective equipment in the lab, like these googles, which are also worn by canine law enforcement and military dogs. Doris Dahl/Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hide caption

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Doris Dahl/Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

People in the United States say someone is "blind as a bat" to mean that person has poor vision. James Hager/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images hide caption

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James Hager/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images

Myth Busting 'Blind As A Bat' And 'Memory Of A Goldfish'

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Psychologist Ken Carter studies why some people seek out haunted houses and other thrills — even though he's not one of them. Kay Hinton/Emory University hide caption

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Kay Hinton/Emory University

The Science Of Scary: Why It's So Fun To Be Freaked Out

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A "murder" scene could seem creepy, but what is going on inside these crows' minds may be most unsettling. Dragan Todorovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Dragan Todorovic/Getty Images
Ji Haixin/VCG /Ji Haixin/VCG via Getty Images

Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

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Researcher Nalini Nadkarni studies the ecology of the forest canopy. Colin Marshall/NPR hide caption

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Colin Marshall/NPR

Tree Scientist Inspires Next Generation ... Through Barbie

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This Scientist Is Working To Get More Girls Up Into Tree Canopies

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Qieer Wang for NPR

How Magic Mushrooms Can Help Smokers Kick The Habit

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Studying active volcanoes can be dangerous, which is why a group of scientists from around the world came together to simulate volcanic blasts. What they're learning will help them at a real eruption. NPR hide caption

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