Madeline K. Sofia Madeline Sofia is the host of Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast.
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Madeline K. Sofia

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Maddie
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Madeline K. Sofia

Host, Science Desk

Madeline Sofia is the host of Short Wave — NPR's daily science podcast. Short Wave will bring a little science into your life, all in about 10 minutes. Sometimes it'll be a good story, a smart conversation, or a fun explainer, but it'll always be interesting and easy to understand. It's a break from the relentless news cycle, but you'll still come away with a better understanding of the world around you.

Before hosting Short Wave, Sofia hosted the NPR video show "Maddie About Science." The show takes viewers behind the scenes with scientists, revealing their motivations and sharing their research — from insect mimics to space probes headed for the sun. Sofia also co-developed the worldwide NPR Scicommers program, which supports scientists interested in building their communication skills.

Before working at NPR, Sofia received her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of Rochester Medical Center. She studied Vibrio cholerae, a fascinating bacterium that has haunted the human race.

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Brassica oleracea is a plant species that includes broccoli--as well as kale, cauliflower, collard greens and brussels sprouts. Inti St Clair/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Inti St Clair/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Yep, We Made Up Vegetables

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A meadow reflects in a raindrop hanging from a blade of grass in Dresden, Germany. Robert Michael/dpa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Michael/dpa/AFP via Getty Images

Paleontologist Yara Haridy studies fossils that range from 10,000 years old to 480 million years old. Yara Haridy hide caption

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Yara Haridy

Taking A New Look At Some Old Bones

Paleontologist Yara Haridy looks at fossilized bones for a living. When she randomly walked by a scientific poster one day, she discovered an entirely new way to take pictures of her fossils. The results are shedding new light on how bones evolved.

Taking A New Look At Some Old Bones

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Half of all the adults in the US have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Each person vaccinated helps fight the pandemic's spread. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Rainbow in Lenk, Switzerland Fredy Jeanrenaud / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Fredy Jeanrenaud / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Rainbows! How They Form And Why We See Them

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A tobacco store advertises and sells Juul tobacco products in midtown Manhattan. Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images

Big Vape: The Incendiary Rise of Juul E-cigarettes

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Jacob Balogun, 12, of DC receives a COVID-19 vaccine. Children's National Hospital gave the vaccine to its first batch of 12-15 year old children on May 13. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Im

The State Of Vaccinations In The U.S.

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Thick white sulfur dioxide smoke rises thousands of feet above Mount Pinatubo, Phillipines, June 1,1991. Romy Mariano/AP hide caption

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Romy Mariano/AP

Who Should Control Earth's Thermostat?

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The employees at Presidente Supermarket in Miami, Florida — like the rest of America's grocery store workers — are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, helping to keep the nation's residents fed. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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The contents of an overdose rescue kit are displayed in a class on overdose prevention held by non-profit Positive Health Project. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A European badger (Meles meles) turns its powerful snoot to the sky. Damian Kuzdak/Getty Images hide caption

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Damian Kuzdak/Getty Images

A dose of Pfizer-Biontech Covid-19 vaccine is prepared in a pharmacy. Ivan Romano/Getty Images hide caption

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Ivan Romano/Getty Images

Covid-19 patients with difficult breathing are aided with oxygen masks outside Gurudwara. Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

A person skateboards along the Venice Beach boardwalk in Venice, California. The CDC issued new guidelines stating that fully vaccinated people do not need to wear masks outdoors, except in crowded locations. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A Vaccination Update And The CDC's Latest Guidance On Masks

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This Brooklyn building is going green--Dan Charles has tips on how to make one's home more environmentally friendly. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles