Madeline K. Sofia Madeline Sofia is an associate producer on NPR's Science Desk.
Maddie Sofia 2018 square
Stories By

Madeline K. Sofia

Meredith Rizzo/NPR
Maddie Sofia 2018
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Madeline K. Sofia

Associate Producer, Science Desk

Madeline Sofia is an associate producer on NPR's Science Desk. She hosts the show "Maddie About Science," which takes viewers behind the scenes with scientists, revealing their motivations and sharing their research—from insect mimics to space probes headed for the sun.

The show is part of the special project "Joe's Big Idea." The goal of "Joe's Big Idea" is to tell scientific stories that explore the minds and motivations of researchers, and highlight the scientific process. "Joe's Big Idea" is also involved in helping young scientists become better scientific communicators. These scientists are part of a world-wide group known as NPR Scicommers. Sofia is in charge of connecting the Scicommers and facilitating their growth as communicators. NPR Scicommers regularly volunteer at outreach events, publish stories in major outlets, and collaborate with each other. If you're interested in working with NPR Scicommers, visit the JBI Facebook page.

Before working at NPR, Sofia received her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of Rochester Medical Center. She studied Vibrio cholerae, a fascinating four billion-year-old single-celled organism that has evolved to outsmart the human immune system.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Studying active volcanoes can be dangerous. Which is why a group of 40 scientists and engineers from all over the world came together to simulate volcanic blasts. What they're learning will help them at a real eruption. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

Saving Hellbender Salamanders NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

VIDEO: Snot Otters Get A Second Chance In Ohio

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545796084/550892217" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Avi Ofer for NPR

How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/531749974/547099694" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Northern elephant seals recognize each other's voices based on rhythm and pitch. Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology hide caption

toggle caption
Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology

Threat call of a northern elephant seal

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538092965/538098553" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Deilephila elpenor, commonly called the elephant hawk-moth, has specialized eyes that don't reflect light. Such moths inspired scientists to invent an anti-glare coating for smart screens. Ullstein Bild/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ullstein Bild/Getty Images

A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

toggle caption
Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529505847/529804700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript