Madeline K. Sofia Madeline Sofia is an assistant producer on NPR's Science Desk, and specifically for
Meredith Rizzo/NPR
Madeline Sofia 2017
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Madeline K. Sofia

Assistant Producer, Science Desk

Madeline Sofia is an assistant producer on NPR's Science Desk, and specifically for Joe's Big Idea. The goal of Joe's Big Idea is to tell scientific stories that explore the minds and motivations of researchers, and highlight the scientific process. Joe's Big Idea is also involved in helping young scientists become better scientific communicators. These scientists are part of a world-wide group known as Friends of Joe's Big Idea, or FOJBIs. Madeline is in charge of connecting the FOJBI community and facilitating their growth as communicators. FOJBIs regularly volunteer at outreach events, hold science socials, and contribute to blogs.

Before working at NPR, Madeline received her Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology from the University of Rochester Medical Center. She studied Vibrio cholerae, a fascinating 4 billion-year-old, single-celled organism that's evolved to outsmart the human immune system — and cause cholerae. If you're interested in working with us, check out the JBI Facebook page.

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Adult Eastern hellbenders can grow up to 2 feet long and weigh around 5 pounds. They are currently endangered in several states. Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures RM/Getty Images

VIDEO: Snot Otters Get A Second Chance In Ohio

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How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

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Northern elephant seals recognize each other's voices based on rhythm and pitch. Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology hide caption

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Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology

Threat call of a northern elephant seal

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Deilephila elpenor, commonly called the elephant hawk-moth, has specialized eyes that don't reflect light. Such moths inspired scientists to invent an anti-glare coating for smart screens. Ullstein Bild/Getty Images hide caption

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Ullstein Bild/Getty Images

A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

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Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

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In an artist's rendering, a gigantic, cassowarylike dinosaur named Beibeilong, which lived some 90 million years ago, incubates its eggs. Zhao Chuang/Nature Communications hide caption

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Zhao Chuang/Nature Communications

Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

A tardigrade, known as a water bear, is shown magnified 250 times. These tiny aquatic invertebrates can go without water for 10 years, surviving as a dessicated shell. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images

How One Of The World's Toughest Creatures Can Bring Itself Back To Life

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The micromotor device may someday be used to deliver antibiotics to the stomach. Angewandte Chemie International Edition hide caption

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Angewandte Chemie International Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

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Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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