Madeline K. Sofia Madeline Sofia is an assistant producer on NPR's Science Desk, and specifically for

Adult Eastern hellbenders can grow up to 2 feet long and weigh around 5 pounds. They are currently endangered in several states. Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures RM/Getty Images

VIDEO: Snot Otters Get A Second Chance In Ohio

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How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

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Northern elephant seals recognize each other's voices based on rhythm and pitch. Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology hide caption

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Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology

Threat call of a northern elephant seal

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Deilephila elpenor, commonly called the elephant hawk-moth, has specialized eyes that don't reflect light. Such moths inspired scientists to invent an anti-glare coating for smart screens. Ullstein Bild/Getty Images hide caption

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Ullstein Bild/Getty Images

A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

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Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

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In an artist's rendering, a gigantic, cassowarylike dinosaur named Beibeilong, which lived some 90 million years ago, incubates its eggs. Zhao Chuang/Nature Communications hide caption

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Zhao Chuang/Nature Communications

Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

A tardigrade, known as a water bear, is shown magnified 250 times. These tiny aquatic invertebrates can go without water for 10 years, surviving as a dessicated shell. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images

How One Of The World's Toughest Creatures Can Bring Itself Back To Life

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